Like Wrigley Field in Chicago, Camden Yards seems to be tucked deeply into its downtown area. (I noticed this view while watching Mark Buehrle get his 200th win against the Orioles.)

Per this tweet, this is what the gas prices look like on Alaska’s north slope on April 10, 2015.

From the Android developer docs on bitmap images:

Bitmaps (bitmap images) take up a lot of memory, especially for rich images like photographs. For example, the camera on the Galaxy Nexus takes photos up to 2592x1936 pixels (5 megapixels). If the bitmap configuration used is ARGB_8888 (the default from the Android 2.3 onward) then loading this image into RAM takes about 19MB of memory (2592*1936*4 bytes), immediately exhausting the per-app memory limit on some devices.

In trying to understand Yahoo’s financials, I came across this good article. It includes these tidbits:

Just read that in Java -- or at least in Android -- from a performance standpoint, having two arrays is better than having a two-dimensional array (or, more generally, a multi-dimensional array). I found this on the Android performance tuning page.

Book/movie idea: A person who doesn’t have a lot of money is told they’re going to die soon, and they want to see the world; how do they do it? (Like The Bucket List, but someone who isn’t rich.)

This article on phonearena.com shows good performance information when comparing the new Samsung Galaxy 6 to the almost-as-new Apple iPhone 6. The HTC One M9 is also covered. The results show that the iPhone 6 is fastest in single-core performance, the Galaxy 6 is fastest in multi-core performance, and the M9 is neck-and-neck with the iPhone 6 in graphics performance.

This was an interesting note about screen resolution: “When it comes to resolution, the differences between these three phones could not be larger: the iPhone 6 sports a 750 x 1334-pixel 4.7 inch display; the One M9 has a 1080 x 1920-pixel 5 inch screen; and the Galaxy S6 a 1440 x 2560-pixel 5.1 inch display.”

I don’t know if this is true, but I saw this story on someone’s Facebook timeline. (I can’t link to the story because they re-posted an image, and said it comes from a private group named In The Company of Wolves, who I don’t follow. There are also multiple Facebook accounts with that name.)

This cute photo of two black dogs comes from the Iditarod Trail Committee Facebook page.

I like this description of the proper mindfulness technique: “Not judging what you see, not considering it good or bad, just seeing what you see, with interest ... staking out your inner experience, like a wildlife photographer in an exotic location, waiting for the moment to snap.” I don’t know who the speaker is, but I heard that on a Buddhify recording.

I just ran across this information about dividend-paying stocks outperforming non-dividend stocks in this Motley Fool article about Apple stock. Some of that data is bound to be skewed. For instance, new businesses can’t afford to pay dividends, and I’m sure that new business fail much more than other businesses. If you just put $10,000 into all non-dividend-paying stocks, you would surely choose some bad ones.

Another good Theo Epstein quote: “We’re all-in ... if you just do what’s best for the Cubs, always think of the Cubs first, things will work out.”

I don’t remember who said this, but this is a quote about Theo Epstein’s patience and discipline, in particular as it applies to re-building the Chicago Cubs.

I like this description of the proper mindfulness technique: “Not judging what you see, not considering it good or bad, just seeing what you see, with interest and curiosity. Staking out your inner experience, like a wildlife photographer in an exotic location, waiting for the moment to snap.” It comes from the “Base” recording under the “Waiting Around” category of the Buddhify app. (Sorry, I don’t know the name of the speaker.)

I think my Radio Pi project has a ton of potential, and if I had more time and money I’d be working on it full-time. But until that ever happens, this Grace Digital Wi-Fi Music Player looks like the best thing available.

I woke up yesterday at 3:30 a.m. and knew something was wrong. I had a pain in my lower-left abdomen that felt very wrong. Long story short, after another hospital trip I now know what diverticulitis feels like.

Alaska called me, Africa called the current Google CFO, Patrick Pichette. Here’s the story of how he just chose life over work.

Joyful Discipline: Making what appear to be difficult lifestyle choices based on larger goals or intentions. (“Discipline” doesn’t have to be a negative word.)

On Mac OS X systems you can adjust the volume in quarter-steps. Press Option-Shift-F11 to reduce the volume by a quarter-step, and Option-Shift-F12 to increase it by a quarter-step. (This is actually really important when you use USB headphones, which tend to be too loud by default.)

You can also adjust the brightness the same way. Press Option-Shift-F1 to decrease the brightness by a quarter-step, or or Option-Shift-F2 to increase it the same amount.

I found this tip on macworld.com.

“We can cultivate curiosity in this moment by simply asking, ‘What is happening right now?’” ~ Emily Horn on the Buddhify app