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Linux cp command examples

The Linux cp command lets you copy one or more files or directories. To be clear, the cp command makes a duplicate copy of your information, whereas the mv command moves your information from one location to another.

Let's take a look at some Linux cp command examples.

Simple file copying

Using a Linux or Unix system, to copy a file named "foo" to a new file named "bar" just type:

More Linux grep command examples

The Linux grep command is used to search for text. The name "grep" means something like "general regular expression parser", and if you look at the grep man page it says "print lines matching a pattern". I always tell people that if they don't like the name "grep" they can think of it as "search" instead.

In "grep tutorial", we'll share a number of grep example commands. Let's get started.

The Linux cd command

The Linux cd command is used to navigate around the Linux filesystem. In this post I'll show the most common uses of the cd command.

To move to another directory on the filesystem just use the Linux cd command to move to the desired directory. For instance, this command:

cd /tmp

moves you to the /tmp directory, and this command:

cd /foo/bar

would move you to a directory named /foo/bar, assuming that directory existed.

I like my platform freedom

As I've started to work on designing an HTML editor I'd like for the Mac platform, a little irony has set in: I find that I don't want to write it in Objective C. Given my history with Java, I find that I don't want to be tied to one platform, even Mac OS X. What if I install Ubuntu later this week (as scheduled) and fall madly in love with it? I want my application to work there also.

Linux ls command examples

Linux ls command FAQ: Can you share some examples of the Unix/Linux ls command?

The Linux ls command is used to list files and directories. While it has many options, I thought I'd list the most common ls command uses I'm aware of.

The ls command options I use most of the time are -a ("show all") and -l ("long listing"). Put together, like this:

Linux tutorial, part 5

Using command-line expansion

Now, if I'm really cool, I don't actually type out that whole remove command, do I? As a practical matter I usually just type in something like this:

rm de

and then hit the [Tab] key, and if "delete.me" is the only file in the current directory beginning with the characters "de" the Unix system expands my command line to look like this:

rm delete.me

Pretty cool, eh? That part is called "command-line expansion", and it makes life very easy.

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