alvin's blog

A Java applet sound example

We all know that multimedia, used properly, can make any web site more entertaining. In this applet tutorial, we'll present a brief example of a Java applet that plays a sound file when it is downloaded. The compiled applet class file is very small - only 559 bytes - and can be downloaded quickly into a user's web browser.

Linux tutorial, part 1

I thought I'd take a little time and write a tutorial on how to get started with the Linux, Unix, and Mac OS X operating systems. As I write this I'm trying to keep in mind a friend of mine who works strictly on Windows, so I'm writing this from that perspective.

Here then is my "Getting Started with Linux and Unix" tutorial.

A tag-based filesystem

After working with del.icio.us and other tag-based systems, and thinking about adding tag support and other features to this blog, I started wondering if anyone had applied the "tag" concept to any other systems that are typically directory-based (as del.icio.us seems like a very good replacement for a traditional hierarchical organization (directory) of bookmarks).

Mac HTML editor product reviews

Mac HTML editor review: I didn't go exactly where I wanted with that last post about Mac WYSIWYG HTML editors, so let me try again. This time I'll go the product review route I initially planned to go in that last post.

Mac HTML editors

First, as I related in that post I'm not happy with any of the Mac HTML editors I've found. Second, the point I didn't make, is that these are the Mac HTML editors I've looked at so far:

Looking for a Mac HTML WYSIWYG editor

My search for a Mac WYSIWYG HTML editor continues ... I just finished trying Coda, but I don't like it much more than I like using a text editor like TextMate.

I understand the need for these HTML/text-editing tools when you get down to the nitty-gritty details of HTML editing and you want to work only with the HTML source code, and Coda or TextMate on the Mac are good for that.

Linux file searching - Search for text in files with find and grep commands

Linux find/grep FAQ: How can I combine the Linux find and grep commands to search a large collection of files?

A lot of times when I need to find a file I know the text in the file that I'm looking for, but I can't remember the filename, or can't think of what directory it might be in, other than somewhere below my home directory. When this happens, and other search means like the "locate" command don't help, my favorite way of searching for text strings in files that are spread through a bunch of directories and sub-directories is this:

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