format

A `printf` format reference page (cheat sheet)

Summary: This page is a printf formatting cheat sheet. I originally created this cheat sheet for my own purposes, and then thought I would share it here.

A great thing about the printf formatting syntax is that the format specifiers you can use are very similar — if not identical — between different languages, including C, C++, Java, Perl, PHP, Ruby, Scala, and others. This means that your printf knowledge is reusable, which is a good thing.

An example of Scala’s `f` string interpolator

With Scala it’s common to embed variables in strings like this with the s string interpolator:

val name = "Fred"
println(s"My name is $name.")

That’s cool, but when you need to format your string, Scala gives you an even more powerful tool: the f string interpolator. Here’s an example of how I just did this in my LittleLogger logging library:

How to convert Asciidoc to HTML

As a brief note to self, if you need to convert an Asciidoc file named test1.adoc to HTML format, this command works:

asciidoc -o test1.html test1.adoc

Of course a key here is that you need the asciidoc command installed. I installed it on my Mac with Homebrew, something like brew install asciidoc. I don’t like the HTML that this approach generates, so I’ll keep looking for something better.

Some Scala Long, Date, and SimpleDateFormat examples

At some point I’ll get all of my Scala “date utilities” together in a single class (object, actually), but until then, here are a couple of date utility methods I wrote for my Scrupal6 project (a replacement for Drupal 6):

Format of the Linux crontab date and time fields

I’ve written several things about the Linux cron command and crontab file format before, and as a quick note, here’s some information on the format of the crontab date and time fields.

Crontab date/time fields

First, from the crontab man page documentation:

Scala number, date, and formatting examples

This short blog post contains a collection of Scala number and date examples. I created most of these in the process of writing the Scala Cookbook. Unlike the Cookbook, I don’t describe the examples here much at all, I just show the examples, mostly as a reference for myself (and anyone else that can benefit from them).

Scala numeric types

Scala has these numeric types:

Scaladoc syntax examples (Scaladoc tags, wiki markup)

Table of Contents1 - An example of Scaladoc tags and wiki formatting2 - Sample Scaladoc output3 - Common tags4 - Scaladoc “wiki” character formatting tags5 - Scaladoc “wiki” paragraph formatting tags6 - Generating Scaladoc documentation with SBT7 - See Also8 - The Scala Cookbook

In this article I share some examples of Scala’s Scaladoc syntax, including common Scaladoc tags, and the wiki-style of markup that Scaladoc supports.

 

(this space left open to make room for the table of contents over there -->)

 

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An example of Scaladoc tags and wiki formatting

You can mark up your source code using Scaladoc tags as well as a wiki-like syntax. The following code shows many of the Scaladoc tags and a few of the wiki-style markup tags:

This is a page from my book, Functional Programming, Simplified

About the book format

Although I could easily write hundreds of pages about my consulting experiences, I want to create a book that is “accessible,” a book you can speed-read over one or two nights if you like, or perhaps read more slowly, focusing on just one chapter at a time. With this format — and with the extra “Summary” chapters at the end of the book — you can also use it as a reference, such as the night before a big meeting with a client.