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Lucene example source code file (ByteBlockPool.java)

This example Lucene source code file (ByteBlockPool.java) is included in the DevDaily.com "Java Source Code Warehouse" project. The intent of this project is to help you "Learn Java by Example" TM.

Java - Lucene tags/keywords

allocator, allocator, byteblockpool, byteblockpool, current, current, first_level_size, first_level_size, num_bytes_object_ref, util, where, which

The Lucene ByteBlockPool.java source code

package org.apache.lucene.index;

/**
 * Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one or more
 * contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file distributed with
 * this work for additional information regarding copyright ownership.
 * The ASF licenses this file to You under the Apache License, Version 2.0
 * (the "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance with
 * the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
 *
 *     http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
 *
 * Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
 * distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
 * WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
 * See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
 * limitations under the License.
 */

/* Class that Posting and PostingVector use to write byte
 * streams into shared fixed-size byte[] arrays.  The idea
 * is to allocate slices of increasing lengths For
 * example, the first slice is 5 bytes, the next slice is
 * 14, etc.  We start by writing our bytes into the first
 * 5 bytes.  When we hit the end of the slice, we allocate
 * the next slice and then write the address of the new
 * slice into the last 4 bytes of the previous slice (the
 * "forwarding address").
 *
 * Each slice is filled with 0's initially, and we mark
 * the end with a non-zero byte.  This way the methods
 * that are writing into the slice don't need to record
 * its length and instead allocate a new slice once they
 * hit a non-zero byte. */

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import static org.apache.lucene.util.RamUsageEstimator.NUM_BYTES_OBJECT_REF;
import org.apache.lucene.util.ArrayUtil;


final class ByteBlockPool {

  abstract static class Allocator {
    abstract void recycleByteBlocks(byte[][] blocks, int start, int end);
    abstract void recycleByteBlocks(List<byte[]> blocks);
    abstract byte[] getByteBlock();
  }

  public byte[][] buffers = new byte[10][];

  int bufferUpto = -1;                        // Which buffer we are upto
  public int byteUpto = DocumentsWriter.BYTE_BLOCK_SIZE;             // Where we are in head buffer

  public byte[] buffer;                              // Current head buffer
  public int byteOffset = -DocumentsWriter.BYTE_BLOCK_SIZE;          // Current head offset

  private final Allocator allocator;

  public ByteBlockPool(Allocator allocator) {
    this.allocator = allocator;
  }

  public void reset() {
    if (bufferUpto != -1) {
      // We allocated at least one buffer

      for(int i=0;i<bufferUpto;i++)
        // Fully zero fill buffers that we fully used
        Arrays.fill(buffers[i], (byte) 0);

      // Partial zero fill the final buffer
      Arrays.fill(buffers[bufferUpto], 0, byteUpto, (byte) 0);
          
      if (bufferUpto > 0)
        // Recycle all but the first buffer
        allocator.recycleByteBlocks(buffers, 1, 1+bufferUpto);

      // Re-use the first buffer
      bufferUpto = 0;
      byteUpto = 0;
      byteOffset = 0;
      buffer = buffers[0];
    }
  }

  public void nextBuffer() {
    if (1+bufferUpto == buffers.length) {
      byte[][] newBuffers = new byte[ArrayUtil.oversize(buffers.length+1,
                                                        NUM_BYTES_OBJECT_REF)][];
      System.arraycopy(buffers, 0, newBuffers, 0, buffers.length);
      buffers = newBuffers;
    }
    buffer = buffers[1+bufferUpto] = allocator.getByteBlock();
    bufferUpto++;

    byteUpto = 0;
    byteOffset += DocumentsWriter.BYTE_BLOCK_SIZE;
  }

  public int newSlice(final int size) {
    if (byteUpto > DocumentsWriter.BYTE_BLOCK_SIZE-size)
      nextBuffer();
    final int upto = byteUpto;
    byteUpto += size;
    buffer[byteUpto-1] = 16;
    return upto;
  }

  // Size of each slice.  These arrays should be at most 16
  // elements (index is encoded with 4 bits).  First array
  // is just a compact way to encode X+1 with a max.  Second
  // array is the length of each slice, ie first slice is 5
  // bytes, next slice is 14 bytes, etc.
  final static int[] nextLevelArray = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 9};
  final static int[] levelSizeArray = {5, 14, 20, 30, 40, 40, 80, 80, 120, 200};
  final static int FIRST_LEVEL_SIZE = levelSizeArray[0];

  public int allocSlice(final byte[] slice, final int upto) {

    final int level = slice[upto] & 15;
    final int newLevel = nextLevelArray[level];
    final int newSize = levelSizeArray[newLevel];

    // Maybe allocate another block
    if (byteUpto > DocumentsWriter.BYTE_BLOCK_SIZE-newSize)
      nextBuffer();

    final int newUpto = byteUpto;
    final int offset = newUpto + byteOffset;
    byteUpto += newSize;

    // Copy forward the past 3 bytes (which we are about
    // to overwrite with the forwarding address):
    buffer[newUpto] = slice[upto-3];
    buffer[newUpto+1] = slice[upto-2];
    buffer[newUpto+2] = slice[upto-1];

    // Write forwarding address at end of last slice:
    slice[upto-3] = (byte) (offset >>> 24);
    slice[upto-2] = (byte) (offset >>> 16);
    slice[upto-1] = (byte) (offset >>> 8);
    slice[upto] = (byte) offset;
        
    // Write new level:
    buffer[byteUpto-1] = (byte) (16|newLevel);

    return newUpto+3;
  }
}

Other Lucene examples (source code examples)

Here is a short list of links related to this Lucene ByteBlockPool.java source code file:



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