personal

personal

Heart disease deaths linked to poor dietary choices

From this NY Times article: “But when it comes to the burden of disease,” he added, “some of the leading risk factors are not high intake of unhealthy foods, but low intake of healthy foods.”

As one example, I read in a book about food-related diseases that red meat isn’t necessarily bad for people, it’s just that people in the U.S. tend to eat red meat without eating anything healthy along with it.

Why do I keep misplacing things?

“I don’t understand, why do I keep losing things?”

“This is a dream,” Bec said. “Things have a way of coming and going.”

“Oh yeah, right, right,” I said, gently poking the chair next to me like Monk. “It always seems so real.”

“Do you need to get some sleep?”

“No, I’m good now. I just got lost in it for a moment. Let’s do something.”

“Like what?”

And thus the adventure began ...

(A little story based on a dream from March 12, 2015.)

“I know my husband, and he can be trusted”

When Mrs. Albert Einstein was asked if she understood her husband’s Theory of Relativity, she replied, “No ... but I know my husband, and he can be trusted.”

Ratio of women to men who have mast cell diseases

From what I can tell by the interactions on the The Mastocytosis Society group on Facebook, there is at least a 10:1 or 20:1 ratio of women to men who have mast cell diseases. Or, more accurately, those are the ratios of people who (a) know they have mast cell diseases and (b) interact in this group on Facebook.

MCAS/MCAD skin reaction

My immune system has been struggling the last two weeks since I had some bad Kroger yogurt. (The yogurt didn’t taste bad, but I got very sick within an hour of eating it.) Today I put a mala on my wrist like I have 10-15 times this year, and after a little while it felt like it was itching and burning. This is what my skin looked like almost half an hour after I took it off. I’m assuming that this is a result of the mast cell disease (MCAS).

The Amazon Kindle “supported formats” page alvin March 10, 2017 - 11:19am

If you ever want to write your own book as an Amazon Kindle book, here’s the Kindle “supported formats” page.

Natural mast cell stabilizers

Per this article on healinghistamine.com, some natural mast cell stabilizers are: Khellin; Quercetin; Epigallocatechin gallate (a green tea compound); Silibinin (from milk thistle); Ellagic acid; Reservatrol; Curcumin; Garcinia mangostana (mangosteen).

The author further states, “Also in the bioflavonoid family are luteolin and apigenin, the latter of which can be found in parsley, celery, rosemary, oregano, thyme, basil, coriander and artichokes.”