Scala programming jobs

Every once in a while I query the job search engines to see what’s out there these days. The last time I did this was in February, 2013. Back then I only searched for “Scala” programming jobs, and this is what I found:

  • careerbuilder.com - 83
  • dice.com - 230
  • monster.com - 81
  • indeed.com - 1,080

I don’t trust the data from indeed.com. They list jobs multiple times, and keep things online forever, so I don’t look at them any more, not for data like this.

Dice lists contracting jobs, so with a new technology like Scala, I think they’re a decent indicator of the coming market. That’s just my opinion, though. I know that when I worked at a NASA subcontractor, we hired contractors either because (a) they were much better than other people we could hire, or (b) because they knew an up-and-coming technology we didn’t know.

July, 2013

On July 1, 2013, I just took the time to do a few more searches, this time for a variety of keywords, and this is what I found:

CareerBuilder:

  • scala - 74
  • play framework - 3
  • akka - 3
  • cassandra - 156
  • hadoop - 438
  • mongodb - 193
  • java - 9,569
  • javascript - 6,307

Dice.com:

  • scala - 309
  • play framework - 28
  • akka - 18
  • cassandra - 517
  • hadoop - 1457
  • mongodb - 706
  • java - 17,710
  • javascript - 11,179

Monster:

  • scala - 109
  • play framework - 16
  • akka - 7
  • cassandra - 216
  • hadoop - 582
  • mongodb - 369
  • java - 1,000+ (they don’t list the exact number)
  • javascript - 1,000+ (they don’t list the exact number)

Those big numbers for Java show where Scala can hope to get one day. (I only ran the JavaScript numbers because I was curious how they compared to Java.)

A quick look at the Scala data

I ran names like cassandra, hadoop, mongodb, java, and javascript to get a little perspective, but what I’m most interested in are the Scala jobs. Here’s a quick look at the Scala data:

  • CareerBuilder: decreased from 83 to 74 (-11%)
  • Dice: increased from 230 to 309 (+34%)
  • Monster: increased from 81 to 109 (+35%)

You can read into those numbers what you like. For me, they’re still too small, but I like tracking them over time to see how things are changing.

The future

I’ll run these numbers again a few months from now to see how things look. I didn’t see the point in creating any charts for this little bit of data, but I’ll be glad to start creating some charts as we have more data points.

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