ant

Deploying a Project with CVS and Ant

A few simple steps

(Note: These comments were specific to our company's use of Ant to deploy our Java projects. If you're not using Ant, any Ant commands shown here won't apply to your project.)

To deploy any of our Java projects using Ant, just follow steps similar to these to check the project out of CVS and then build it on the server:

A better test for detecting Unix operating systems in an Ant build script

In several previous tutorials (see my references below) about testing for operating systems within Ant build scripts, and then conditionally executing targets based on the results of those tests, I noted that Mac OS X operating systems respond to both Mac and Unix test conditions based on the Ant "os family" test. I mentioned that I thought this behavior was probably correct, because Mac OS X is built an a Unix base (BSD, to be specific).

Ant FAQ: How to determine the platform operating system in an Ant build script

Problem

You're creating an Ant build script, and you need to determine the operating system the script is running on, so you can make conditional decisions within the build script. You typically want/need to do this if you're going to run tasks/targets that are different for each operating system (Mac, Windows, Unix, etc.).

An Ant 'exclude classes' example

Problem: You want to build your Java project using Ant but you need to be able to skip certain files -- typically unit test files -- during the compilation or deployment processes.

Solution: You can skip files during the Ant compilation process by using the Ant exclude pattern. Here's an example that shows several exclude patterns in some XML code taken directly from an Ant build script:

Java: How to handle drop events to your Mac OS X Dock icon (Part 2)

In Part 1 of this tutorial I shared the Java source code you need to handle drag and drop events on Mac OS X. But as I mentioned in that tutorial, the recipe to handle files that are dropped onto your Dock application icon requires a little more work, in particular an Ant build process that uses the JarBundler task. So here in Part 2 of this tutorial, I'm sharing my Ant build script that completes this recipe.

Ant - How to use a date or timestamp in an Ant build script

Summary: An Ant date and timestamp (tstamp) task example.

I was just digging through some Ant build scripts I've created, and I noticed a segment of a build script that first creates a timestamp, and then uses that timestamp in the process of creating a manifest file. (This build script is used for building a Java Swing application.)

Here's the code from my Ant script that does this timestamp magic:

How to compile a Java program with Ant

While I'm digging around through Ant build scripts today, here's a sample Ant target I created that demonstrates how to compile a Java program, while also showing a few other things, including how to exclude your JUnit tests during the compile process.