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ScalaJ-HTTP examples: GET, POST, handling redirects alvin November 22, 2016 - 4:34pm

If you ever need some good ScalaJ-HTTP examples, see the test files in the project, including this HttpBinTest.scala file. That file currently shows a number of good ScalaJ-HTTP examples, including GET, POST, redirect examples with Scala.

See that page for a full list of examples, but for my own use, here are a few of them.

CSS border-bottom dotted RGB color opacity setting alvin August 13, 2016 - 6:27pm

As a quick note, if you ever want to created a dotted border that has some RGB opacity to it, I just used the following CSS code to style some hyperlinks, and I can confirm that it works:

A custom TextMate command that uses ‘sed’ alvin August 10, 2016 - 5:19pm

In this post I share the contents of a custom TextMate command I just created that uses pandoc and sed to convert markdown content in the TextMate editor to a “pretty printer” version of HTML:

#!/bin/sh

PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/bin

# note: 'sed -E' gives you the advanced regex's

# use pandoc to convert from markdown to html,
# then use sed to clean up the resulting html
pandoc -f markdown -t html |\
sed -Ee "/<p|<h2|<h3|<h4|<aside|<div|<ul|<ol/i\\
\\"

You can try to use a command like tidy to clean the HTML, but the version of tidy I have does not know about HTML5 tags. The TextMate Markdown plugin also doesn’t work the way I want it. Besides that, I’m trying to learn more about writing TextMate commands anyway.

As an important note, when you set this up as a TextMate command and then run it, it will convert the TextMate editor contents from markdown to HTML.

(In a related note, serenity.de is also a good resource for TextMate command and bundle documentation.)

In summary, this code shows:

* How to execute a Unix shell command from TextMate
* Specifically, how to execute a sed command from TextMate
* How to use modern regular expressions with sed (the -E option)
* How to search for multiple regex search patterns with sed

Markdown comments syntax: Comments that won’t appear in generated output

Markdown FAQ: How do I create comments in Markdown? Especially comments that won’t appear in the generated output.

Part 1 of my answer is that technically there is no way — or at least no standard way — to create comments in Markdown documents, other than to use HTML comments like this:

Getting started converting documents with Pandoc

I’m looking into producing my Scala/FP book as a PDF, and as part of that I have been looking into Pandoc. With the exception of converting HTML tables into other formats such as Markdown or LaTeX, Pandoc has been working well so far.

Here are a couple of Pandoc commands to show you how easy this is:

# create a pdf from a markdown doc
pandoc test1.md -s -o test1.pdf

# create an html doc from a markdown doc, long form
pandoc test1.md -f markdown -t html -s -o test1.html

# convert markdown to latex
pandoc test1.md -s -o test1.tex
pandoc test1.md -f markdown -t latex -s -o test1.tex

# read a markdown doc and print html to stdout
pandoc -s table.md --to html

As a “note to self,” this command helps with the Pandoc HTML to Markdown table conversion problem:

pandoc table.html --to=markdown_github -o table.md

I think the problem is that I’m used to a specific type of table markdown, and Pandoc emits something else by default.

For more information on Pandoc, see their getting started doc and user’s manual.

When you want to store static text in an Android file

As a note to self, when you’re writing an Android application and you think you want to store some static text in an external file, a better approach can be to create a resource file under res/values.

For example, I’m currently adding some help text to an Android app, and to do that I created a file named strings_help.xml under the res/values directory. That file contains HTML wrapped in an XML CDATA tag, like this: