osx

How to replace newline character with sed on Mac OS X (macOS)

I don’t have much time to explain this today (I’ll try to remember to update it when I get back), but ... if you’re interested in seeing how to use the sed command on a Mac OS X (macOS) system to search for newline characters in the input pattern and replace them with something else in the replacement pattern, this might point you in the right direction.

How to fire Mac OS X notifications with AppleScript (and Scala)

Summary: This tutorial demonstrates how to fire MacOS system notifications with AppleScript (and Scala or Java).

In this article I assume that you already know at least a little bit about how to use AppleScript, and just want to know how to trigger a MacOS notification. At the end of the tutorial I show how to invoke the AppleScript code using Scala and Java.

Mac exodus? alvin October 30, 2016 - 3:41pm

I haven’t been blown away by MacOS (nee OS X) in quite some time, and the latest MacBook design seems to have annoyed even more developers. A good thing about this is that it got me looking into Qubes OS, “a reasonably secure operating system.”

Apple’s philosophy of “we design the hardware and software” works well when people like your work, but when people don’t like your design it’s easy to lose customers.

Two more Textmate commands (capitalize, CSV to list)

As a “note to self,” I wrote two more Textmate commands yesterday, one to capitalize each word in a selection of words, and another to convert a CSV list of words to a simple list. Here’s the source code for the Capitalize command:

#!/bin/sh

perl -ne 'print ucfirst $_'

The $_ portion of that Perl command isn’t required, but I include it as a reminder to myself about how Textmate commands and snippets work.

Here’s the source code for my Textmate command that uses the Unix tr command to convert a CSV list of words (such as a paragraph of comma-separated words) into a simple list of words:

#!/bin/sh

tr , "\n"

As you can see, those commands are fairly simple. If you know Unix/Linux and then know a little about how to write Textmate commands, you can usually get it to do what you want. I like that you can use any Mac/Unix programming language or tool to solve the problem at hand.

Apple has an iOS/macOS “Stagefright” security flaw

According to Forbes and other sources, Apple now has its own version of a “Stagefright” security flaw, and it affects all but the most recent versions of iOS and Mac OS X. Theoretically all it requires is that a hacker sends your phone one text.

Apple’s minimalist security announcements are here: iOS 9.3.3 update, OS X update.

How to set the Java version on Mac OS X (macOS) systems

I don’t remember where I first found this line of code, but if you put it in your Mac OS X ~/.bash_profile file, it’s an easy way to set your Mac Java version:

export JAVA_HOME=`/usr/libexec/java_home -v 1.8`

I can confirm this works with the Bash shell on Mac OS X 10.10. When I run the java -version command after opening a new Mac Terminal window, the output is 1.8.0_25.

A slightly more difficult way to set your Mac Java version is to look under the /Library/Java/JavaVirtualMachines directory to see which versions are installed, and then manually set the version.

What is the Mac OS X (macOS) fonts folder? (to add new fonts)

Apple/Mac FAQ: I want to add new fonts to my Mac, what is the Mac OS X (macOS) fonts folder?

Just put any new font files in the Library/Fonts folder under your home directory. For instance, my Mac OS X username is alvin, so the correct fonts folder is:

Lesson learned from Apple: Keep innovating, or die

One lesson learned from Apple recently is that if your products stagnate, people will start to look around, and may spend their money elsewhere. As just one small example of this, iOS got boring for me, so I started looking around and bought an Android tablet instead of a new iPad. These days the Mac and macOS feel stagnant — or worse than that, moving in the wrong direction by removing features like Spaces — so I’m looking at desktop alternatives as well.

All fonts available with XeTex and XeLaTeX

To generate a list of all fonts available available with XeTex and XeLaTeX, use this command at your Unix command line:

fc-list : family

I found that command at this tex.stackexchange.com URL.

That command may also work with Windows, but I don’t have a Windows system to test with. Note that it took a little while to run the first time, then it returns almost instantly after that.