osx

Can't delete a Mac burn folder - problem solved

Mac problem: Can't delete a Mac burn folder. (Problem solved.)

I just had a problem on Mac OS X where I couldn't delete a Mac burn folder. Something happened during the process of trying to burn a DVD ... frankly I can't remember what the problem was. (I had one problem with a DVD during the verification process, so that may have been it.)

Mac Terminal - disable blinking text

Working on my Mac OS X system, when I use the ls command on a remote system, that system is configured to show blinking text for all files ending with the ".sh" filename extension. If you've ever had to look at blinking text when trying to read output from an ls command you know that can be really annoying. (Is there ever a time that blinking text isn't annoying?)

So, to disable blinking text in the Mac OS X Terminal application just follow these steps:

Mac DVD burn example - How to burn a DVD on Mac OS X

Mac DVD burn FAQ: How do I burn a CD or DVD on a Mac? (iMac, MacBook, Mac Pro, etc.)

It's funny, I've had a MacBook Pro for well over a year now, but haven't burned a CD or DVD until today. I actually didn't know how to do it, so I just inserted a blank DVD-R into the drive and then figured out what to do. Here's a quick summary of the "Mac CD/DVD burn" steps I followed.

Exploring the Linux locate command

The Linux locate command lets you easily find files in the filesystem. It works by maintaining a system-wide database of "all files which are publicly accessible". The database itself is updated periodically by a background process. Because of this approach it returns results much faster than the find command, which only looks for files when you tell it to. Depending on your system, the locate command may need to be configured initially, or it may be pre-configured to work out of the box.

More Linux grep command examples

The Linux grep command is used to search for text. The name "grep" means something like "general regular expression parser", and if you look at the grep man page it says "print lines matching a pattern". I always tell people that if they don't like the name "grep" they can think of it as "search" instead.

In "grep tutorial", we'll share a number of grep example commands. Let's get started.

I like my platform freedom

As I've started to work on designing an HTML editor I'd like for the Mac platform, a little irony has set in: I find that I don't want to write it in Objective C. Given my history with Java, I find that I don't want to be tied to one platform, even Mac OS X. What if I install Ubuntu later this week (as scheduled) and fall madly in love with it? I want my application to work there also.

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