osx

Mac Finder tip: delete a file without dragging it to the Trash

Mac Finder FAQ: How can I delete a file using just the keyboard, i.e., some keystroke combination?

Lots of people ask me if the only way to delete a file is to drag it to the trash can on the Dock. After all, pressing the [delete] key sure doesn't delete it.

The short answer is yes, you can delete a file in the Mac Finder with the keyboard by:

Mac tip: command-click the folder icon

If you're a mouse user, and you need to move up the folder hierarchy when using the Finder, an easy way to do this is to Command-click the folder name at the top of the current Finder window. I've shown this in the following image. To display this menu I didn't just click the folder icon, I held down the [Command] key while clicking it. This lets me easily move up one or more levels in the folder hierarchy just by selecting one of the other folder names in the drop-down list.

Mac tip: re-displaying hidden windows

Every once in a while I get a similar message from a new Mac OS X user: Help, I've hidden a window from an application, how do I get it back? Having freaked out the first time I accidentally hid a window, I know what that feeling is like.

Fortunately bringing back a hidden window is easy, if not obvious. Just go to the Dock, and click the application icon for the window you accidentally hid. For instance, let's say you accidentally hid a Safari window. Just go to the Dock, and click the Safari icon. Instantly your hidden window comes back into view.

Mac tip: show just this application

Mac OS X has a couple of cool tricks for helping you focus on just one application at a time. One of them is the "hide all other programs" trick.

To hide windows from all other applications, and just show windows from your current application, type [Option][Command][H]. Instantly all the other windows are hidden.

Mac Finder FAQ: Is there a simple way to jump to a folder using the Mac Finder?

Mac Finder FAQ: Is there a simple way to go to a folder when using the Mac Finder?

If you're using the Finder on Mac OS X, and you know the path of the folder you want to open, you can do this quickly using the "go to folder" command. With a Finder window open (or, you can just click on the Desktop), press the [Shift][Command][G] key sequence, and you'll see this window displayed:

Mac lost password - lost OS X root password

Wow, I thought I'd get really secure when I took my MacBook Pro on vacation recently. So secure that I managed to forget the root password after I changed it. (duh) Fortunately I found an easy way to change it after I lost it.

I was lucky enough that I created one of my login accounts as an administrator ("Admin") account, and that's all I needed. Well, that, a Terminal, and the sudo command. :) Here's what I did.

Mac Genie tip - how to enable the slow Genie effect

Have you ever seen Steve Jobs (or anyone else) do the "slow Genie" effect when minimizing a window on Mac OS X, and wondered how they did that?

Turns out it's pretty simple: just hold down the Shift key when clicking the yellow minimize button on any Mac OS X window. Assuming you have the Genie effect enabled (see your Dock preferences), the Genie effect will still work, but it will send your window to the Dock very slowly. This may not be too useful for everyday work, but it is kinda cool for presentations. :)

 

Mac - VoodooPad review

VoodooPad is a really interesting application for Mac OS X users. As stand-alone applications go I don't know any good comparisons. But when you compare it to web applications it's easy to say, "Oh, it's a wiki." But really, it's a personal, one-user wiki, written as a fat client instead of a web application, with a few extra features thrown in for good measure.

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