performance

An ArchLinux page on Improving Performance alvin January 21, 2017 - 12:25pm

Ubuntu is running great on my old 2008 iMac, but if you’re having Linux performance issues, here’s an ArchLinux page titled “Improving performance.”

Optimizing Linux for slow computers

This is a link to an article titled, “Optimizing Linux for slow computers.” Note that this article links to this more thorough resource on archlinux.org.

Here are a couple of paragraphs from it:

When tuning a server, you'll really want to tweak for performance and high throughput. That's where most Linux configurations really shine over the competition: they come better tuned to get the most out of server configurations.

Ubuntu running on a 2008 27” iMac

As shown in the image, I just installed Ubuntu on my 2008 27” iMac. The UI is interesting, a combination of MacOS and Windows. From what I’ve seen, I think I’ll like the Ubuntu UI (Unity) more than Linux Mint, but I’m open. So far Ubuntu is also significantly faster than the latest versions of MacOS were on the same hardware, though that may be because MacOS had a few hundred thousand more files on it than Ubuntu has at the moment.

iPhone/iOS: How to quit using cellular data when using WiFi

I live in Colorado, where cellular reception can be very hit or miss. As just one example there are only two spots in my apartment where I can make a phone call. So when I’m at home trying to view a website using Safari on my iPhone and the page is loading really slow, I find it really annoying that my iPhone is trying to use my cellular data rather than my home wireless network (WiFi).

Note: Apple implies that the cellular data is “assisting” the WiFi, but with the poor cell reception here, I can confirm that this feature just slows down my iPhone internet speed.

Process, not results

There’s a well-known sports psychologist in Denver who tells people to feel less stress by focusing on process, not the results of the process. I suspect that’s where this Adam Gase quote comes from:

“We’re just trying to get players better, rather than worrying about the result. We follow our process, and whatever the outcome ends up being, well, it’s been good in the past.”