programming

Drupal 8: How to write a simple custom “block module” alvin June 21, 2016 - 8:25pm
Table of Contents1 - Goals2 - Backup your database3 - Check my code out of Github, or create a module directory4 - Create a project info YAML file5 - Create the necessary subdirectories6 - Write the code to display your block7 - Clear the caches8 - Enable the module9 - Place the block module10 - See the custom block on your website11 - The biggest problem I encountered12 - The source code13 - Summary

In this tutorial I’ll demonstrate how to write a simple Drupal 8 “block module.” By this I mean that I’ll show you how to write a simple Drupal 8 module that will display output in a block. When you’re done you will have created a new block that you can place in one or more theme regions.

A terrific Model View Controller (MVC) diagram

Every once in a while when something hits you, you really remember it; it stands out in your mind as an “Aha” moment. One of those moments for me was when I saw a particular “Model/View/Controller” (MVC) diagram, and the light bulb went on. This diagram made the MVC pattern very simple, and I’ve never forgotten it.

The karma of bad software documentation

Tried to use someone’s software library.
Documentation was bad, couldn’t get it to work.
Used someone else’s.

#haiku-ish

An intense curiosity about how things are done alvin January 29, 2017 - 9:13am

In his book, The Universal Tone: Bringing My Story to Light, Carlos Santana writes about hearing other guitar players, and wondering with an intense curiosity how those other people got their guitars to make the sounds they made. As I thought about this I thought it was a good attitude to have in programming. For instance, if I look at an application where someone has done something really cool I try to understand, “How did they do that?”

Dan Bricklin: The history of VisiCalc and other things

Dan Bricklin, inventor/creator of VisiCalc, the first spreadsheet program for personal computers, has created this page of historical notes and images about his work. His work came long before my interest in computers and programming, so I enjoy reading about it from a historical perspective. He shows a TI calculator and very large state diagram on this page. I remember seeing calculators like that in stores, and the work he put into the state diagram looks like a modern mind map.

If you’re into history, it’s all very cool.