projects

The Scala community build project

Scala community build is an interesting project, which is described like this:

“This repository contains configuration files that enable us to build and test a corpus of Scala open source projects together using Lightbend's `dbuild`. How big is it? It’s 3.2 million lines of Scala code, total, from 185 projects (as of January, 2019), and takes about 15 hours to run.”

“Why do this? The main goal is to guard against regressions in new versions of Scala (language, standard library, and modules). It’s also a service to the open source community, providing early notice of issues and incompatibilities.”

The Red Hat ethos

The URL contains a statement of the Red Hat ethos. A couple of good quotes:

Open source is a development model, not a business model. Red Hat is in the enterprise software business and is a leading provider to the Global 500. Enterprise customers need products, not projects and it’s incumbent on vendors to know the difference. Open source projects are hotbeds of innovation and thrive on constant change. These projects are where sometimes constant change happens, where the development is done.

“They’ve got the keys to the car and they can drive it”

Several years ago I stepped away from a consulting gig. I had an opportunity to continue the gig, but I didn’t enjoy it, and didn’t like the direction the project was headed in. This quote from this article about the Denver Post expresses how I feel very well:

“I have total disagreement with how they're managing the place, but I'm not going to stand up and be overly critical of them. They've got the keys to the car and they can drive it any way they want to. But they're not driving it in a way that I want to be a passenger of the car.”

(That reminds me of the old Alaska sled dog saying: “If you’re not the lead dog, the view never changes.”)

Arduino projects and information

(The following content is from an email I sent to a relative about the Arduino. They have a college-age student who we might be interested in this.)

The programmable electronics kit I showed you is named "Arduino". Here's the main URL: arduino.cc

Here are links to some fun Arduino projects:

Rule number one for software project managers

Here's my Rule #1 for Project Managers, as looked at from the perspective of a software developer:

Show active interest in your project, and in the people that work on the project.

Okay, I know that seems obvious -- and I'm a little fired up about this right now -- but I've been amazed to work with project managers in the last few years who seem to have more important things to do outside of work than they have to do at work, and by this I only mean during the Monday through Friday, 8-to-5 time frame.