reduce

Kotlin collections methods: examples and syntax

As a quick note today, if you ever need some examples of how the Kotlin collections methods work, I hope these examples are helpful.

Sample data

First, here’s some sample data:

val a = listOf(10, 20, 30, 40, 10)
val names = listOf("joel", "ed", "chris", "maurice")

Scala List class: methods, examples, and syntax

This page contains a large collection of examples of how to use the methods on the Scala List class.

The Scala List class as an immutable, linear, linked-list class. It’s very efficient when it makes sense for your algorithms to (a) prepend all new elements, (b) work with it in terms of its head and tail elements, and (c) use functional methods that traverse the list from beginning to end, such as filter, map, foldLeft, reduceLeft.

Scala Seq class: methods, examples, and syntax

This page contains a large collection of examples of how to use the methods on the Scala Seq class.

Important note about Seq, IndexedSeq, and LinearSeq

As an important note, I use Seq in the following examples to keep things simple, but in your code you should be more precise and use IndexedSeq or LinearSeq where appropriate. As the Seq class Scaladoc states:

Scala Vector informational and mathematical methods (syntax, examples)

This page contains a collection of examples of how to use Scala Vector class informational and mathematical methods. Note that these same methods will also work with a Scala Seq, including IndexedSeq.

Informational and mathematical methods

As the name implies, these methods let you get information about the contents of a Vector, or perform mathematical expressions on a Vector.

This is a page from my book, Functional Programming, Simplified

Appendix: Recursion is Great, But ... (Scala’s fold and reduce)

“Folds can be used to implement any function where you traverse a list once, element by element, and then return something based on that. Whenever you want to traverse a list to return something, chances are you want a fold. That’s why folds are, along with maps and filters, one of the most useful types of functions in functional programming.”

From the book, Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!

The “reduce, reduce, reduce” mantra applied to writing

One philosophy I have about writing technical material is that I want to condense the material as much as possible, to the point where I want people who use yellow highlighters to mark most of what I write. I am one of those people who use yellow highlighters, and I look for that property in books that I read.

This isn’t necessarily true for blog posts that I write, because for these I usually write them pretty fast. But for books, I take the time to review them and look for this quality. This follows the design mantra, “reduce, reduce, reduce.”