mast cell activation syndrome

Why am I always sick? (or, “Why are you always sick?”)

“Why am I always sick?” That’s a question I used to ask myself a lot.

Other people asked it as well: “Why are you always sick?”

I remember one time when I was in the same room as my wife while she was on the phone. She was taking to her sister, who was talking about her husband (my brother-in-law), and their conversation went on for quite some time. Afterwards I said, “Wow, I hope you guys don’t talk about me all the time like that.” My wife said, “No, we just always say that you seem to get sick a lot.”

“Rare disease makes woman allergic to everything, including her husband”

From a today.com story about a woman who has a more severe form of the illness/disease I have:

“Johanna Watkins, 30, is allergic to almost everything and everyone, including her husband Scott, 29. She’s been diagnosed with mast cell activation syndrome, a rare and progressive immunological condition.”

“She has a list of 15 foods she can eat and that’s it. Even those foods make her feel ill, it’s just that they don’t kill her. She’s eaten the same two meals for two years.”

(The image is from the today.com story.)

Cured meats bad for asthma

Writing as someone who likely has Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS) and who has also looked into histamine intolerance, it was surprising to see the headlines in this image being “news” in 2016. MCAS was officially designated as a disease in 2007, and for anyone who knows about it, there’s nothing new about this. Cured foods are well known to be a trigger for people with mast cell issues, meaning that eating cured foods is known to trigger mast cells to release histamine (i.e., to degranulate).

Six rules of mast cells (mast cell disease) alvin October 17, 2016 - 10:26am

iamast.com offers these “Six rules of mast cells” on their beginners/terms page.

Diagnosing mast cell activation disease (MCAS, MCAD, Dr. Afrin)

This is a good quote from Dr. Afrin, from this MeAndMyMastCells.com page about diagnosing mast cell activation disease (MCAS, MCAD), which explains why it has taken this long to get close to a diagnosis of my illness. Regular everyday doctors, even the hematologist I saw last week, may know about mastocytosis, but they don’t know about mast cell activation disease.