cheatsheet

“Kotlin Quick Reference” book

Table of Contents1 - Kotlin Quick Reference2 - It’s free3 - It’s open source4 - A caveat5 - Contributing6 - The Kindle version7 - Downloads

Somewhere in mid-2017 I started working on a Kotlin programming book, but then I had to get away from it to work on other things. When I got back to it recently I looked around and felt like the world didn’t need another “Introduction to Kotlin” book — there are a couple of good ones out there, including Kotlin in Action, and the kotlinlang.org documentation is excellent — so I decided to ditch the project completely.

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Kotlin Quick Reference

But then when I started writing some Kotlin code again I realized that what I really needed was a quick reference. I didn’t want to have to dig through a tutorial book or website to find what I need, I just wanted something like a large cheat sheet where I could quickly find the Kotlin syntax and examples for whatever I was working on at that moment. So I decided to strip down what I had already written and create both a book and a Kotlin Quick Reference website.

A printf format reference page (cheat sheet)

Summary: This page is a printf formatting cheat sheet. I originally created this cheat sheet for my own purposes, and then thought I would share it here.

A cool thing about the printf formatting syntax is that the specifiers you can use are very similar, if not identical, between several different languages, including C, C++, Java, Perl, Ruby, and others, so your knowledge is reusable, which is a good thing.