friendship

A Christmas Story

[From time to time I write little stories that have nothing to do with programming or technology; this is one of those stories. So, if you’re only here for the technology stuff, you’ll want to skip this one.]

I’m standing in the kitchen of a friend’s house at a Christmas party, making myself a drink while talking to a friend named Angie. This was nothing unusual; she and I were always talking about something. We became friends during our last year in high school, and we’ve been talking every since.

In retrospect it’s obvious that I have feelings for her, but I guess you could say that I didn’t appreciate her back then. After high school my ambition took me away to college, and then to a series of jobs in different states. By the time I decided to move back home, she was married and had two young children.

While we talked all the time, this kitchen conversation was unusual. I don’t remember how it started, but Angie did ask me about something I rarely talk about: my parents getting divorced in high school.

This is a page from my book, “How I Sold My Business: A Personal Diary”

Tuesday, June 14, 2005

After a lot of thinking about this, I made a second offer to buy Jack's LLC shares back from him again today. I won't say that Jack has "checked out" of the company, but my opinion is that his work is more suited for someone at a much larger company than ours, and I don't think that's a good attitude for a major shareholder to have.

This is a page from my book, “How I Sold My Business: A Personal Diary”

Background: 2000 through 2002

So much happened in our business in the years 2000 through 2002, I could easily write a separate book about everything we did to survive. If the first few years of business were at the “easy” end of the spectrum, these years were way, way over at the “difficult” end. I’m glad to say we survived the dot-com bust, and then survived the bad business environment that followed the events of September 11, 2001. By mid-2002 I considered us fortunate to still have the same fifteen full-time employees. We didn't have to lay anyone off, and nobody left the company.