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The best UML “Use Case” definition I know

Every time I read an article or book about UML “Use Cases” I cringe a little bit. Every author says something like “Jacobson left the definition of a Use Case too open,” and then they try to work through some elaborate scheme of what a Use Case means to them. IMHO, the best use case definition was created in the early 1980s, long before Jacobson mentioned the term.

How I make very early software cost estimates (Part 1)

Summary: I use Function Point Analysis (FPA) and Yesterday’s Weather to make “back of the envelope” software cost estimates when discussing potential new software projects with decision makers.

The problem

Many times when a software project is in its earlier stages (the conceptualization phase), the people that control the money at an organization (the CEO, CFO, CIO, etc.) want the best estimate they can get regarding the time and cost of a software development project. This is often very early in the project lifecycle, typically shortly after someone said, “Hmm, that sounds like a very interesting idea” and well before the first check is cut. In short, they want the best back of the envelope, ballpark cost estimate you can give them.

The solution

I used to dread these discussions, because I hated estimating the time and cost of software projects. I wasn’t any good at it, and the developers I worked with weren’t any good at it either. But once I learned two things:

Dear Business Analyst: If you can’t count the Function Points, you’re about to enter a world of hurt alvin August 10, 2009 - 6:20pm

One of the great things about Function Point Analysis (FPA) is that it can be a terrific validator of the work you’re doing as a business analyst. For example, here’s one of the guidelines I came up with after I learned about FPA:

If you can’t count the Function Points when you’re about to start developing a software project, you’re about to enter a world of hurt.

How to find a good Function Point Analysis consultant

As I've written several articles lately about Function Point Analysis (FPA), it occurred to me that, just as any other service, there's a big difference between being a Certified Function Point Specialist (CFPS), and a really valuable CFPS.

So, if you're interested in hiring a CFPS, or renting a CFPS consultant, I'd like to share a few thoughts here about what I think makes a good CFPS.

A good Function Point specialist

I don't sell my services as a CFPS any more, but when you're looking for a good CFPS, I think a good CFPS is like a good accountant:

Function Point Analysis resources (FPA)

Just cleaning up around here lately, it looks like I never really linked up to some of the cost estimating and Function Point Analysis (FPA) tutorials and slide shows I've created. So without any fruther ado, here are some links to my free FPA tutorials and presentations:

Function Point Analysis presentations online

I've had some Function Point Analysis documents available here before, and recently finished converting those presentations into a better form for the internet. To that end I've gathered all these in a new Function Point Analysis Education Center, which contains those free documents and presentations.

These educational documents cover FPA, cost estimating, and even cost estimating for Agile software development projects.

Tue, July 6, 2004 (Speaking at BorCon 2004)

Over the weekend I saw that I'm on Borland's speaking schedule for their annual conference, BorCon 2004. I guess I better get to work on my presentations. :) Actually, I'm ready to go. I'm set to give one talk on Java Performance Tuning and another on Function Point technology. Giddyup.

I haven't frequented it before, but the Java & Internet Glossary at mindprod looks pretty good.