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Java example source code file (ManagedClientConnection.java)

This example source code file (ManagedClientConnection.java) is included in the DevDaily.com "Java Source Code Warehouse" project. The intent of this project is to help you "Learn Java by Example" TM.

Java tags/keywords

connectionreleasetrigger, httpclientconnection, httpcontext, httpinetconnection, httpparams, httproute, io, ioexception, managedclientconnection, net, object, ssl, sslsession, threading, threads, timeunit

The ManagedClientConnection.java example source code

/*
 * ====================================================================
 * Licensed to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) under one
 * or more contributor license agreements.  See the NOTICE file
 * distributed with this work for additional information
 * regarding copyright ownership.  The ASF licenses this file
 * to you under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the
 * "License"); you may not use this file except in compliance
 * with the License.  You may obtain a copy of the License at
 *
 *   http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
 *
 * Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing,
 * software distributed under the License is distributed on an
 * "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY
 * KIND, either express or implied.  See the License for the
 * specific language governing permissions and limitations
 * under the License.
 * ====================================================================
 *
 * This software consists of voluntary contributions made by many
 * individuals on behalf of the Apache Software Foundation.  For more
 * information on the Apache Software Foundation, please see
 * <http://www.apache.org/>.
 *
 */

package org.apache.http.conn;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

import javax.net.ssl.SSLSession;

import org.apache.http.HttpClientConnection;
import org.apache.http.HttpInetConnection;
import org.apache.http.HttpHost;
import org.apache.http.params.HttpParams;
import org.apache.http.protocol.HttpContext;

import org.apache.http.conn.routing.HttpRoute;

/**
 * A client-side connection with advanced connection logic.
 * Instances are typically obtained from a connection manager.
 *
 * @since 4.0
 */
public interface ManagedClientConnection extends
    HttpClientConnection, HttpInetConnection, ConnectionReleaseTrigger {

    /**
     * Indicates whether this connection is secure.
     * The return value is well-defined only while the connection is open.
     * It may change even while the connection is open.
     *
     * @return  <code>true if this connection is secure,
     *          <code>false otherwise
     */
    boolean isSecure();

    /**
     * Obtains the current route of this connection.
     *
     * @return  the route established so far, or
     *          <code>null if not connected
     */
    HttpRoute getRoute();

    /**
     * Obtains the SSL session of the underlying connection, if any.
     * If this connection is open, and the underlying socket is an
     * {@link javax.net.ssl.SSLSocket SSLSocket}, the SSL session of
     * that socket is obtained. This is a potentially blocking operation.
     * <br/>
     * <b>Note: Whether the underlying socket is an SSL socket
     * can not necessarily be determined via {@link #isSecure}.
     * Plain sockets may be considered secure, for example if they are
     * connected to a known host in the same network segment.
     * On the other hand, SSL sockets may be considered insecure,
     * for example depending on the chosen cipher suite.
     *
     * @return  the underlying SSL session if available,
     *          <code>null otherwise
     */
    SSLSession getSSLSession();

    /**
     * Opens this connection according to the given route.
     *
     * @param route     the route along which to open. It will be opened to
     *                  the first proxy if present, or directly to the target.
     * @param context   the context for opening this connection
     * @param params    the parameters for opening this connection
     *
     * @throws IOException      in case of a problem
     */
    void open(HttpRoute route, HttpContext context, HttpParams params)
        throws IOException;

    /**
     * Indicates that a tunnel to the target has been established.
     * The route is the one previously passed to {@link #open open}.
     * Subsequently, {@link #layerProtocol layerProtocol} can be called
     * to layer the TLS/SSL protocol on top of the tunnelled connection.
     * <br/>
     * <b>Note: In HttpClient 3, a call to the corresponding method
     * would automatically trigger the layering of the TLS/SSL protocol.
     * This is not the case anymore, you can establish a tunnel without
     * layering a new protocol over the connection.
     *
     * @param secure    <code>true if the tunnel should be considered
     *                  secure, <code>false otherwise
     * @param params    the parameters for tunnelling this connection
     *
     * @throws IOException  in case of a problem
     */
    void tunnelTarget(boolean secure, HttpParams params)
        throws IOException;

    /**
     * Indicates that a tunnel to an intermediate proxy has been established.
     * This is used exclusively for so-called <i>proxy chains, where
     * a request has to pass through multiple proxies before reaching the
     * target. In that case, all proxies but the last need to be tunnelled
     * when establishing the connection. Tunnelling of the last proxy to the
     * target is optional and would be indicated via {@link #tunnelTarget}.
     *
     * @param next      the proxy to which the tunnel was established.
     *                  This is <i>not the proxy through which
     *                  the tunnel was established, but the new end point
     *                  of the tunnel. The tunnel does <i>not yet
     *                  reach to the target, use {@link #tunnelTarget}
     *                  to indicate an end-to-end tunnel.
     * @param secure    <code>true if the connection should be
     *                  considered secure, <code>false otherwise
     * @param params    the parameters for tunnelling this connection
     *
     * @throws IOException  in case of a problem
     */
    void tunnelProxy(HttpHost next, boolean secure, HttpParams params)
        throws IOException;

    /**
     * Layers a new protocol on top of a {@link #tunnelTarget tunnelled}
     * connection. This is typically used to create a TLS/SSL connection
     * through a proxy.
     * The route is the one previously passed to {@link #open open}.
     * It is not guaranteed that the layered connection is
     * {@link #isSecure secure}.
     *
     * @param context   the context for layering on top of this connection
     * @param params    the parameters for layering on top of this connection
     *
     * @throws IOException      in case of a problem
     */
    void layerProtocol(HttpContext context, HttpParams params)
        throws IOException;

    /**
     * Marks this connection as being in a reusable communication state.
     * The checkpoints for reuseable communication states (in the absence
     * of pipelining) are before sending a request and after receiving
     * the response in its entirety.
     * The connection will automatically clear the checkpoint when
     * used for communication. A call to this method indicates that
     * the next checkpoint has been reached.
     * <br/>
     * A reusable communication state is necessary but not sufficient
     * for the connection to be reused.
     * A {@link #getRoute route} mismatch, the connection being closed,
     * or other circumstances might prevent reuse.
     */
    void markReusable();

    /**
     * Marks this connection as not being in a reusable state.
     * This can be used immediately before releasing this connection
     * to prevent its reuse. Reasons for preventing reuse include
     * error conditions and the evaluation of a
     * {@link org.apache.http.ConnectionReuseStrategy reuse strategy}.
     * <br/>
     * <b>Note:
     * It is <i>not necessary to call here before writing to
     * or reading from this connection. Communication attempts will
     * automatically unmark the state as non-reusable. It can then
     * be switched back using {@link #markReusable markReusable}.
     */
    void unmarkReusable();

    /**
     * Indicates whether this connection is in a reusable communication state.
     * See {@link #markReusable markReusable} and
     * {@link #unmarkReusable unmarkReusable} for details.
     *
     * @return  <code>true if this connection is marked as being in
     *          a reusable communication state,
     *          <code>false otherwise
     */
    boolean isMarkedReusable();

    /** 
     * Assigns a state object to this connection. Connection managers may make 
     * use of the connection state when allocating persistent connections.
     *  
     * @param state The state object
     */
    void setState(Object state);
    
    /**
     * Returns the state object associated with this connection.
     * 
     * @return The state object
     */
    Object getState();
    
    /**
     * Sets the duration that this connection can remain idle before it is
     * reused. The connection should not be used again if this time elapses. The
     * idle duration must be reset after each request sent over this connection.
     * The elapsed time starts counting when the connection is released, which
     * is typically after the headers (and any response body, if present) is
     * fully consumed.
     */
    void setIdleDuration(long duration, TimeUnit unit);

}

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