Short source code examples

As a bit of warning, this is some old Java code, but if you want to create your own Java file utilities (utility methods), this code might help you get started:

I ran into a couple of interesting things today when trying to generate random alphanumeric strings in Scala, which can be summarized like this. I won’t get into the “random” stuff I was working on, but here are a couple of examples of how to generate lists of alphanumeric/ASCII characters in Scala:

scala> val chars = ('a' to 'Z').toList
chars: List[Char] = List()

scala> val chars = ('A' to 'z').toList
chars: List[Char] = 
List(A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, 
     M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, 
     Y, Z, [, \, ], ^, _, `, a, b, c, d, 
     e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, 
     q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z)

scala> val chars = (' ' to 'z').toList
chars: List[Char] = 
List( , !, ", #, $, %, &, ', (, ), *, +, 
     ,, -, ., /, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 
     8, 9, :, ;, <, =, >, ?, @, A, B, C, 
     D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, 
     P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z, [, 
     \, ], ^, _, `, a, b, c, d, e, f, g, 
     h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, 
     t, u, v, w, x, y, z)

As a brief note today, here’s a Scala method to generate a random string that is random length and also contains blank spaces:

If you ever need to intentionally throw and catch an exception with ScalaTest, here’s an example of how to do that:

As a little note to self, here are some examples of how to create ArrayList instances in Kotlin while explicitly assigning their types:

As a little note to self, here are a few let examples in Kotlin:

fun main(args: Array<String>) {

    fun toUpper(s: String?): String? = s?.toUpperCase()

    toUpper(null)?.let {
        // this will never be run
        println("toUpper(null) is: ${it}")
    }

    toUpper("emily")?.let {
        println("toUpper(emily) is: ${it}")
    }

    // `let` can return a value
    val hello = toUpper("Hannah")?.let {
        "Hello, ${it}"
    }
    println(hello)

}

The output looks like this:

As a short post today, here’s an example of a Kotlin implementation of the Adler-32 checksum algorithm:

I ended up not using this code, but if you wanted to see one way to use JSoup’s OutputSettings (Document.OutputSettings) class to set some parameters before calling JSoup.clean, I hope this is helpful:

// tried some things to improve the html output
val settings: OutputSettings = new OutputSettings
settings.prettyPrint(true)  //`true` is default
settings.charset("UTF-8")
settings.outline(true)  //this is close to what i want, but too extreme
settings.indentAmount(4)
val cleanHtml: String = Jsoup.clean(html, "", wl, settings)

I can attest that this code works, it’s just not what I need at the moment.

Also, the code shown is written in Scala, but as you can see, it converts easily to Java.

If you ever need a Scala method/function to convert a string with newline characters in it to a sequence of strings (Seq[String]), here you go:

def convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq(s: String): Seq[String] =
    s.split("\n").toVector

You can convert the final result to a Vector, Seq, List, ArrayBuffer, Array, etc., but I prefer Vector. The Scala REPL demonstrates how it works:

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("")
res0: Seq[String] = Vector("")

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("foo")
res1: Seq[String] = Vector(foo)

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("foo\nbar\nbaz")
res2: Seq[String] = Vector(foo, bar, baz)

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("foo\nbar\nbaz\n\n")
res3: Seq[String] = Vector(foo, bar, baz)

I’m short on time today, so I’ll just share this little example of how to write an implicit conversion function in Scala/Dotty:

Back in the old days I thought that any pattern that was including in single-quotes with the Unix grep command meant that the pattern inside the string was completely ignored by grep. But these days I have to escape special characters with a backslash character, which is really annoying. This example shows what I mean:

I just started using a new version of SBT, and when I went to run a test I got this SBT warning message:

At the moment this is kind of funky, but I find that the best way to determine the version of SBT is to move to a temporary directory and then run the sbt sbtVersion command:

As a quick note to self, here’s an example of how to set scalacOptions in an SBT build.sbt file:

scalacOptions ++= Seq(
    "-Xfatal-warnings",
    "-deprecation",
    "-feature",
    "-unchecked",
    "-language:implicitConversions",
    "-language:higherKinds",
    "-language:existentials",
    "-language:postfixOps"
)

As shown, scalacOptions lets you set Scala compiler options in your SBT project build.

If you ever need to convert HTML to AsciiDoc, I just used this Pandoc command and it seems to work well:

pandoc --wrap=none -f html -t asciidoc myfile.html > myfile.adoc

The wrapping part of that command isn’t 100% necessary, but if you don’t use it, Pandoc will wrap the plain paragraph text, which I don’t like because I’ll be editing the resulting AsciiDoc text.

Here’s some of the AsciiDoc text that this command generated:

As a brief note to self, if you need to convert an Asciidoc file named test1.adoc to HTML format, this command works:

asciidoc -o test1.html test1.adoc

Of course a key here is that you need the asciidoc command installed. I installed it on my Mac with Homebrew, something like brew install asciidoc. I don’t like the HTML that this approach generates, so I’ll keep looking for something better.

As a brief note to self, here’s an early example of the syntax of Intersection Types in Scala 3 (Dotty):

As a brief note to self, I was just converting some Java code to Kotlin, and the correct way to convert this Java for loop that uses i as a counter:

for (int i=0; i<tabLayout.tabCount; i++) { ...

is with this Kotlin for loop:

for (i in 0 until tabLayout.tabCount) { ...

The key there for me is the 0 until part of the syntax.

As a note to self, here’s an example of implementing a FragmentStatePagerAdapter Android class in Kotlin:

As a quick note to self, this is an example of how to implement a setOnClickListener on a FloatingActionButton with Android and Kotlin:

fab.setOnClickListener { view ->
    Snackbar.make(
        view,
        "An exciting message!",
        Snackbar.LENGTH_LONG
    ).setAction("Action", null).show()
}

Hopefully that’s enough to get “future me” pointed in the right direction when I need this again. :)

(There are more lambda details at this link.)