list

How to drop the first matching element in a Scala sequence

Summary: This blog post shows one way to drop/filter the first matching element from a Scala sequence (Seq, List, Vector, Array, etc.). I don’t claim that the algorithm is efficient, but it does work.

Background

While creating some Scala test code earlier today I had an immutable list of toppings for a pizza, and I got into a situation where I wanted to remove the first instance of a topping.

Scala: How to fill/populate a list (same element or different elements)

As a quick note, if you ever need to fill/populate a Scala list with the same element X number of times, a simple solution is to use the fill method, like this:

scala> val x = List.fill(3)("foo")
x: List[String] = List(foo, foo, foo)

If you want to populate a list with different element values, another approach is to use the tabulate method:

A Scala ‘foldLeft’ function written using recursion alvin February 23, 2017 - 2:07pm

As a short note, here’s some Scala source code that shows how to write a foldLeft function using recursion:

Starting to write an immutable singly-linked list in Scala

Table of Contents1 - Background: What is a Cons cell?2 - What it might look like in Scala3 - Starting to create my own Cons class4 - My second effort5 - Defining my nil value6 - Defining Cons7 - Replacing the NilCons method bodies8 - Adding a toString method to Cons9 - The complete code at this point10 - I’d really like a :: method11 - Interested?12 - See also

For some examples in my new book on functional programming in Scala I needed to create a collection class of some sort. Conceptually an immutable, singly-linked list is relatively easy to grok, so I decided to create my own Scala list from scratch. This tutorial shows how I did that.

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Background: What is a Cons cell?

The first time I learned about linked lists was in a language named Lisp. In Lisp, a linked list is created as a series of “Cons” cells. A cons cell is simple, it contains only two things:

Scala code to read a text file to an Array (or Seq) alvin January 17, 2017 - 5:04pm

As a quick note, I use code like this read a text file into an Array, List, or Seq using Scala:

def readFile(filename: String): Seq[String] = {
    val bufferedSource = io.Source.fromFile(filename)
    val lines = (for (line <- bufferedSource.getLines()) yield line).toList
    bufferedSource.close
    lines
}
Creating random strings and shuffling them (for JavaFX ListView) alvin January 17, 2017 - 4:35pm

As a short “note to self,” I just used this Scala code to (a) create a list that contains random strings of different lengths, then (b) shuffle the list of strings to create a more random effect:

How to shuffle (randomize) a list in Scala

As a quick note today, to shuffle a list in Scala, use this technique:

scala.util.Random.shuffle(List(1,2,3,4))

Here’s what this approach looks like in the Scala REPL:

Scala ‘for’ loop examples and syntax

Table of Contents1 - Example data structures2 - Basic for loop examples3 - Generators in for loops4 - for loop generators with guards5 - Scala for/yield examples6 - Scala for loop counters (and zip, zipWithIndex)7 - Using a for loop with a Map8 - Multiple futures in a for loop9 - foreach examples10 - Summary

Besides having a bad memory, I haven’t been able to work with Scala much recently, so I’ve been putting together this list of for loop examples.

This page is currently a work in progress, and as of tonight I haven’t tested some of the examples, but ... if you’re looking for some Scala for loop examples — technically called a for comprehension — I hope these examples are helpful.