microsoft

Bill Gates’ greatest mistake alvin June 24, 2019 - 1:04pm

TechCrunch has a nice, full quote from Bill Gates on what he considers his greatest mistake. I include part of the quote in this image because his “winner-take-all” comment is so important.

Mobile is not a neutral platform alvin June 11, 2019 - 3:31pm

Ben Evans has an interesting article from 2015 titled, Mobile is not a neutral platform. Here’s a good quote:

“Of course, all this sort of stuff is a big reason why Google bought Android in the first place — Google was afraid that Microsoft (it was that long ago) would dominate mobile operating systems and shut it out. The obvious fear was around things like preloads, and the justice of that fear was proven right with Maps, where Apple Maps now has 2-3x more users on iOS than does Google Maps, despite being a weaker product — the ‘good enough’ default wins and the platform owner chooses what that is.”

Bill Belichick on Microsoft Surface tablets

Bill Belichick on Microsoft Surface tablets:

“As you probably noticed, I'm done with the tablets. I've given them as much time as I can give them. They're just too undependable for me. I'm going to stick with pictures as several of our other coaches do as well because there just isn't enough consistency in the performance of the tablets, so I just can't take it anymore.”

I don’t know what his specific issues are, but when I watched him smash his tablet I thought, “I know that feeling.”

Gorilla arm

I just stumbled onto this old article about “gorilla arm.” The question that comes to mind is, “Why did Microsoft release touchscreen PCs if designers and testers were aware of these problems?” (Surely anyone who used a Touchscreen PC for any period of time would have known about this.) My guess is that the decision was driven by the sales/marketing team, not by designers and engineers.

Microsoft Is The Very Antithesis Of Strategy

This photo is from an interesting article titled, Microsoft Is The Very Antithesis Of Strategy.

From the beginning of the article: “Microsoft could learn much from Sun Tzu. Over the past fifteen to twenty years, Microsoft has engaged in the very worst kind of generalship. Microsoft has allowed their competitors to join forces and successfully scheme against them. Microsoft has responded to the successes of their competitors by forswearing their strongest weapons, abandoning their strongest defensive positions and rushing to attack their competitors wherever they may be, even if those battlefields were located where Microsoft was at its weakest and their competitors were are at their strongest. When these attacks inevitably failed, Microsoft resorted to wars of attrition. Yet in these wars of attrition, it was Microsoft, not their opponents, who suffered most, taking disproportionally greater losses than they inflicted.”