Alvin Alexander | Java, Scala, Unix, Perl, Mac OS X

“Write shy code — modules that don’t reveal anything unnecessary to other modules and that don’t rely on other modules’ implementations.”

~ Dave Thomas

I can’t remember the history of this image, but the metadata tells me that I created it on May 13, 2014. It looks like I might have applied some artistic effects to it using Gimp, but I think what I actually did was just take a slightly zoomed-in photo with an iPhone 5s, because that also appears in the metadata. Either way, it was the view I had from my previous residence on the west side of Broomfield, Colorado.

Snow on the Rocky Mountains, southeast of Boulder

I get to be radioactive again in a couple of weeks. I heard them say “gamma,” so I’m hoping this has to do with a childhood Christmas wish regarding The Incredible Hulk.

Going to be radioactive again soon

This is a cartoonize’d version of Yoda on Luke Skywalker’s back during Luke’s initial training in the swamp. To create it, I found the original movie image with a Google search, opened the image in Gimp, then worked back and forth with a Cartoonized plugin effect, the Beautify options, and the Artistic/Oilify effect. I can do a lot better than this, but for the purposes of this example, I created this cartoon image in less than five minutes. Given more time, I would clean up Yoda quite a bit before using the Cartoonize effect.

I’ve used Gimp to create almost 2,000 images that I use with the Mac screensaver “rotate images” feature, and this is the latest addition.

(Click the image to see the full-size, 1200x600 pixel image.)

Cartoon of Yoda on Luke Skywalker's back

This is a note that I originally posted here in 2014:

I learned yesterday that my endocrinologist wants me to take a dose of radioactive iodine in about two weeks as a followup treatment for the total thyroidectomy surgery I had two weeks ago. I did some research before and after my meeting with her, and was surprised/amazed to read things like this.

Radioactive iodine warnings

contributors.scala-lang.org remains my favorite website of late. This pre-SIP discussion looking for better ways to define a `main` method is a fun read that demonstrates a collaborative process.

Scala/Dotty SIP process: A better `main` approach?

“The limits of what we know, that’s something you can get lost in.”

~ from the tv series Limitless

Today’s song of the day is When You’re Gone, by the Cranberries.

Last year Friend #1 died, so I ended up staying at Friend #2’s house. When I woke up she was already out of the house, so I started to walk to the coffee maker to make some coffee. At that moment Friend #3 called. I looked at the coffee maker for a moment, then thought, “It will wait a few moments,” so I turned around, picked up the phone, and found a quiet spot to sit down.

At one point I started talking about something and #3 said, “I’m sorry, I can’t hear you.” I didn’t have the heart to tell her that I just woke up, so I kinda cleared my throat and started talking louder. We had a good, honest conversation, the kind you only have when it’s late at night and people are tired and maybe have a little liquid courage and speak from the heart, or in this case that raw time right after someone has died.

When I was watching a show just now with two dead guys talking to each other I remembered that conversation, and also remembered that I never did get that cup of coffee.

I was having a bear of a time trying to understand how to set the default indentation when editing Scala files using Microsoft Visual Studio (VS) Code, but I finally found the solution. The short story is that you want to edit the settings.json file, and add the code that I’ve made bold here:

Traditionally I’ve spent a number of Aprils in Virginia Beach.

#MeepMeep

Virginia Beach or bust?

I think I only have one of these cards left, and I’m not sure if I should give it to the niece who’s graduating in May or the niece who’s getting married in June.

You are sweeter than bee vomit

Several times when I’ve told people in Colorado that I have mast cell disease, they’ve replied, “Have you tried marijuana for that?”

In what might be a related story, one time I went to the ER and a young man there was vomiting extremely loudly and repeatedly into a large bucket. I initially didn’t know what was going on and sat down near him, but once he started vomiting I got up and moved away from him, as everyone else had already done. I recall hearing someone say that he had been there before for the same problem.

I say that it might be related because a few days ago I read that consuming edible marijuana products can lead to “repeated and severe bouts of vomiting,” a condition known as cannabinoid hyperemesis. From what I know, people consume edible products, don’t feel anything immediately, so then they consume some more, etc. Apparently it takes time for consumables to kick in, so when they do, people find out the hard way that they’ve consumed too much. I was just reminded of all that when reading this UCHealth story.

Mac batch image conversion FAQ: How can I “batch convert” images from one image format to another on a Mac, such as BMP to JPG, or PNG to JPG?

As I mentioned in my earlier Mac batch image resizing tutorial, the Mac OS X Automator application is my new best friend. Besides letting you easily batch resize images very easily, the Automator also lets you easily batch create thumbnails for images, and also lets you convert images from one image format to another (BMP to JPG, PNG to JPG, etc.).

Here’s a quick look at how to use the Mac Automator to “batch convert” images from one file format to another, including image file formats like BMP, GIF, JPEG, and PNG.

This scala-lang.org documentation page shares a good reason to use “sealed” traits and classes: When you created sealed traits, the compiler can easily tell all of the subtypes of your class or trait, and as just one benefit, you don’t need to add a default, “catch-all” case in your Scala match expressions.

Scala sealed traits - No need for a default, catch-all case in match expression

Here are two moose that I came across one day in Alaska.

A couple of moose in Alaska

The image shows how Scala 3 (Dotty) enums expand into other Scala code. I thought that was interesting, and you can learn more at this URL.

How Scala 3 (Dotty) enums expand (the under the covers source code)

I recently had my blood drawn by a man with a lot of tattoos and piercings, and while we were talking he asked what my favorite band was. I answered Guns n' Roses, and then asked what his was, and he said, Tool.

I totally forgot about that band. I think back in the day (the 1990s), Schism was my favorite song from them, but I’m still trying to recall them all. I had never seen that video before, but parts of it reminded me of Justin Kamerer and AngryBlue.com.