Posts in the “alaska” category

One of my favorite highway traffic signs in Alaska

This is one of my favorite traffic signs in all of the world. You can find it if you drive north from Anchorage, Alaska towards Wasilla and Palmer. When I lived in Alaska in 2010-2011, I would take the exit to the right to go to Palmer. If you keep going straight you’ll go to Wasilla, followed by Willow, Talkeetna, and eventually Denali and then Fairbanks. (If you’re really gung-ho, as I was, you can also keep driving to Prudhoe Bay, if you don’t mind 400 miles of dirt roads in the Arctic Circle.)

And as you can tell from the highway numbers 1 & 3, there aren’t many main roads in Alaska. :)

One of my favorite road signs in Alaska

One of my favorite road signs in Alaska: “Caution: Yield to All Aircraft.” Seems like great advice. You can find this sign somewhere around Lake Hood, in Anchorage, Alaska.

Ketchikan warns of possible virus spread after quarantine break

From this Juneau Empire article, “Officials say a person who didn’t follow quarantine procedures after arriving in Alaska has created the possibility of broad community spread of the coronavirus. The person went to social gatherings and public places in Ketchikan while awaiting results of a COVID-19 test that turned out positive, officials said.”

(The image comes from that article. I just thought it was beautiful and tried to make an oil painting from it.)

Windy in Wasilla

Yep, it can get windy in Alaska in the winter, especially in the interior. I ate at Evangelos several times, and it was good. (Image from this Twitter page.)

New book on Fred Meyer

I know “Fred Meyer” as the chain of grocery stores in Alaska that are now owned by Kroger. It turns out that the real Fred Meyer was born Fritz Grubmeyer in Germany, and was a “relentless” business person (putting it nicely). The adn.com website reports that there is a new book out about him, and offers this summary.

This photo is of the Fred Meyer grocery store in Palmer, Alaska, where I used to shop. If you walked straight forward towards those mountains about four blocks and then took a right turn, that’s where I lived.

A motel in Haines, Alaska

I’ve been stuffing receipts and junk into a compartment in my car for years, and cleaned it out yesterday. This card is by far the best thing I found in there (find Haines, AK on a map, and you might know why). As I’m shredding things, I just saw that on this day two years ago I was in Virginia Beach.

Where in the world is President Obama? (Alaska, 2015)

In case you wondered where Kotzebue, Alaska (population ~3,300) is, I hope this map is helpful.

One point worth mentioning is that there are no roads on most of the west side of that map. For instance, there is no way to drive from Fairbanks to Nome, Talkeetna to Nome, Fairbanks to Barrow, Nome to Kotzebue, etc. There is one road from Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, and it’s called the Dalton Highway. That’s where the “Ice Road Truckers” drive.

Also of interest is that President Obama is nowhere near Alaska’s state capitol. In fact, Alaska is so big, Juneau, Alaska is not even on this map. It’s off the map to the lower-right.

Map courtesy of Google Maps.

Before I die I want to ... (Juneau, Alaska)

This image comes from 2014, but it’s still a cool idea today. Someone created an art project in Juneau, Alaska that allowed people to complete the sentence, “Before I die I want to ...”

Balto statue, Palmer, Alaska

I lived in Palmer, Alaska for too short a period of time, and on my daily walks I would often go past this statue of Balto in the downtown area. Someone was kind enough to put a hat on him to keep him warm.

Very Old Town, One Way Out

The postal code in Stewart, British Columbia, is “VOT 1WO,” which the locals tell me stands for Very Old Town, One Way Out.

Nome National Forest (an Iditarod joke)

The “Nome National Forest.” The Iditarod race ends in Nome, Alaska, somewhere near here.

If you didn’t realize it, this is actually a joke. What you’re seeing is a bunch of Christmas trees shoved into the snow on top of some sea ice.

The image comes from this Twitter page.