javapackager

Jeyes, a Java version of Xeyes

Jeyes, a Java version of Xeyes

In my spare time back in 2011 I created a Java version of the old Unix/X-Windows “Xeyes” application. If you ever used Xeyes, you know it as a set of eyes that are displayed on-screen, and follow the mouse cursor as you move it around.

Now in 2019 I just brought it back to life, and here’s a 56-second video that shows how it works:

Example: How to use javapackager to build a MacOS application bundle

Table of Contents1 - Building a MacOS application bundle with javapackager2 - The longer story3 - The Mac/Java class4 - The three scripts5 - javapackager notes6 - A “Production” javapackager script

I recently learned how to use the Java javapackager command to build a macOS application bundle — i.e., a regular macOS application — from a Java application. In this tutorial I’ll show how to create a Mac application bundle from a simple Java class, in this case a Java Swing class.

The macOS application signing process doesn’t sign all files

I was surprised to learn that when you sign a macOS application, the signing process doesn’t sign every file under the .app application directory. Here’s a quote from the Apple developer docs:

“Your app’s executable code is protected by its signature because the signature becomes invalid if any of the executable code in the app bundle changes. Note that resources such as images and nib files aren’t signed; therefore, a change to these files doesn’t invalidate the signature.”

How to build a macOS application from a Java Jar file

Table of Contents1 - Background2 - Requirements3 - Building your application4 - Note 1: Font smoothing5 - Note 2: Setting the “application category”6 - The Mac/Java AppBundler7 - More information8 - Summary

In this article I’ll show how to build a macOS application from a Java Jar file. I tested this with Java 1.8 on macOS 10.12.5 (Sierra) on June 29, 2017.

Three assumptions in this process are: