gzip

Git export: How to export a Git project

Git export FAQ: How do I export a Git project, like I would do with a "cvs export" or "svn export"?

There is no "git export" command, so instead you use the "git archive" command. By default, "git archive" produces its output in a tar format, so all you have to do is pipe that output into gzip or bzip2 or other.

Git export example

Here's a simple Git export command I just ran. I moved into the root of my Git project directory, then ran this command to create a new file named "latest.tgz":

The Unix compress command

The Unix compress command is rarely used any more, and has largely been replaced by the Unix/Linux gzip and bzip2 commands. However, on some Unix systems the compress command is still used, so for them, here are a few examples of how to use it.

Unix compress command examples

The following command will compress the file named foo.tar into a new file named foo.tar.Z:

Use zgrep to grep a gzip (gz) file

Linux zgrep FAQ: How do I use the Linux zgrep command? (Or, How do I grep a GZ file?)

Linux users quickly learn how to use the Linux grep command on plain text files, but it takes a little longer to really you can grep gzip (gz) files as well. Here's how.

How to display the contents of a gzip/gz file

Problem: You have a plain text file that has been compressed with the gzip command, and you'd like to display the file contents with the Unix/Linux cat or more commands.

Solution: Instead of using the cat or more commands, use their equivalents for working with gz files, the zcat and zmore commands.

tar gzip example - How to work with files that are tar'd and gzip'd

tar gzip FAQ: How do I work with tar archives that have been created with tar and gzip?

When you work on Unix, Linux, and Mac OS X systems, you'll quickly find that tools like tar and gzip are your good friends, so learning how to work with them is very important. Here's a quick look at how to work with the most common tar/gzip scenarios.

Linux gzip: How to work with compressed files

If you work much with Unix and Linux systems you'll eventually run into the terrific file compression utilities, gzip and gunzip. As their names imply, the first command creates compressed files (by gzip'ing them), and the second command unzip's those files.

In this tutorial I take a quick look at the gzip and gunzip file compression utilities, along with their companion tools you may not have known about: zcat, zgrep, and zmore.

Linux gzip command man page

The contents of this page come from the CentOS Linux gzip man page, i.e., the man page for the Linux gzip command (also known as the help page for the gzip command).

Some Linux tar command examples

The Linux tar command is used to created and extract archives. An archive is one file that contains one or (usually) many other files. The name "tar" itself comes from the phrase "tape archive", but that's just an old name. I mostly just create archives and then send them over the wire these days.

Creating Unix/Linux tar archives

To create an archive of all files in your current directory, and all subdirectories, use this tar command:

Linux ‘tar’ command examples

Unix/Linux tar command FAQ: Can you share some Linux tar command examples?

Sure. I'm a big believer in learning Unix/Linux commands by seeing examples, and I know from experience it will really help to see some Linux tar command examples. But first, a brief bit of background information.

tar gzip example - how to extract a tar archive that has been gzip'd

tar gzip FAQ: Can you show how to extract (un-tar) a tar archive that has been created with tar and gzip?

Say you have a file (archive) named myfile.tar.gz, and you want to unzip it and unpack (un-tar) it in one command. This "tar extract" command should do the trick for you:

tar xzf myfile.tar.gz

That tar command can be read as "use tar and gzip (the 'z' option) to extract the contents of the file (archive) named myfile.tar.gz.