array

How to convert a Java array into a Stream alvin March 1, 2019 - 7:32pm

If you ever need to convert a Java array into a Stream, there are at least two ways to do it.

1) Converting an array to a Stream

First, to convert the entire array to a Stream, use the Stream.of static method like this:

Scala: Generating a sequence/list of all ASCII printable characters

I ran into a couple of interesting things today when trying to generate random alphanumeric strings in Scala, which can be summarized like this. I won’t get into the “random” stuff I was working on, but here are a couple of examples of how to generate lists of alphanumeric/ASCII characters in Scala:

scala> val chars = ('a' to 'Z').toList
chars: List[Char] = List()

scala> val chars = ('A' to 'z').toList
chars: List[Char] = 
List(A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, 
     M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, 
     Y, Z, [, \, ], ^, _, `, a, b, c, d, 
     e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, 
     q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z)

scala> val chars = (' ' to 'z').toList
chars: List[Char] = 
List( , !, ", #, $, %, &, ', (, ), *, +, 
     ,, -, ., /, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 
     8, 9, :, ;, <, =, >, ?, @, A, B, C, 
     D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, 
     P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z, [, 
     \, ], ^, _, `, a, b, c, d, e, f, g, 
     h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, 
     t, u, v, w, x, y, z)
Scala: Convert a String with newline characters to a sequence/list of strings alvin February 2, 2019 - 1:23am

If you ever need a Scala method/function to convert a string with newline characters in it to a sequence of strings (Seq[String]), here you go:

def convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq(s: String): Seq[String] =
    s.split("\n").toVector

You can convert the final result to a Vector, Seq, List, ArrayBuffer, Array, etc., but I prefer Vector. The Scala REPL demonstrates how it works:

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("")
res0: Seq[String] = Vector("")

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("foo")
res1: Seq[String] = Vector(foo)

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("foo\nbar\nbaz")
res2: Seq[String] = Vector(foo, bar, baz)

scala> convertStringWithNewlinesToSeq("foo\nbar\nbaz\n\n")
res3: Seq[String] = Vector(foo, bar, baz)
Kotlin sortedWith syntax and lambda examples alvin August 14, 2018 - 4:24pm

As a quick note, here’s an example of how to use the Kotlin sortedWith syntax with an anonymous function (lambda). Given this list of integers:

val list = listOf(7,3,5,9,1,3)

Here’s an example of how to use sortedWith using a Comparator and lambda:

Kotlin sortedBy syntax and examples alvin August 14, 2018 - 12:30pm

As a quick note, here’s an example of the Kotlin sortedBy syntax. Given this list of strings:

val names = listOf("kim", "julia", "jim", "hala")

the comments after these examples show how the Kotlin sortedBy function works:

Kotlin: Convert a list to a String (joinToString syntax/example)

Here’s a little Kotlin joinToString example. First, a sample list to work with:

val nums = listOf(1,2,3,4,5)

Then here’s the joinToString example:

nums.joinToString(
    separator = ", ",
    prefix = "[",
    postfix = "]",
    limit = 3,
    truncated = "there’s more ..."
)

When you put all of that code in the Kotlin REPL you’ll see this result:

Kotlin groupBy syntax and example alvin August 14, 2018 - 10:40am

Here’s a quick example of how to use the Kotlin groupBy syntax on a list, with the result of each example shown in the comments:

val names = listOf("kim", "julia", "jim", "hala")

names.groupBy { it -> it.length }  //LinkedHashMap: {3=[kim, jim], 5=[julia], 4=[hala]}
names.groupBy({it}, {it.length})   //LinkedHashMap: {kim=[3], julia=[5], jim=[3], hala=[4]}
Recently-added Scala cheat sheets, tutorials, syntax, and examples alvin June 17, 2018 - 6:10pm

As I try to organize things a bit around here, here’s a list of some tutorials I’ve written lately about the Scala collections classes:

How to create a range of characters as a Scala Array

I just noticed this quirk when trying to create an array of characters with the Scala Array.range method:

# works as expected
('a' to 'e').toArray              // Array[Char] = Array(a, b, c, d, e)

# surprise: Array.range always returns Array[Int]
val a = Array.range('a', 'e')     // Array[Int] = Array(97, 98, 99, 100)

I was surprised to see that the Scaladoc for the Array object states that the second example is expected behavior; Array.range always returns an Array[Int]. I suspect this has something to do with a Scala Array being backed by a Java array, but I didn’t dig into the source code to confirm this.

For much more information about arrays, see my Scala Array class examples tutorial.