onclick

Scala.js tutorial: How to start building single-page web applications

Table of Contents1 - Single-page applications2 - 1. Getting started (dependencies)3 - 2. Create hello3.html4 - 3. Create Hello3.scala5 - 4. Run the code!6 - Summary/Discussion7 - Resources8 - More facades9 - Other tutorials in this series10 - Bonus!11 - Source code

In this final, third part of my three-part introductory series on Scala.js I’ll demonstrate a technique that can help you build single-page web applications with Scala.js. That is, the body of your HTML page will look like this:

<body>
    <div id="root"></div>          

    <script type="text/javascript" src="./target/scala-2.12/scala-js-hello-world-jsdeps.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="./target/scala-2.12/scala-js-hello-world-fastopt.js"></script>
</body>

After that, your entire application will then be written in Scala/Scala.js, which is converted into JavaScript code in the scala-js-hello-world-fastopt.js file.

A Scala.js tutorial: “Hello, world” with an HTML button click

Table of Contents1 - 1. Create a new HTML page2 - 2. Make updates to use jQuery3 - 3. The new Scala code4 - 4. Setting the main class5 - 5. Running this example6 - Discussion7 - Summary

In my first “Hello, world” Scala.js tutorial I showed how to get started with Scala.js, including some necessary setup/configuration work. That tutorial ended by showing how to get the string “Hello, world” displayed in a browser.

In this tutorial I’ll take this a little further and show how to create an HTML button you can click that results in the string “Hello, world” being displayed in a JavaScript alert window. When the button is clicked, the alert window will be displayed by your Scala/Scala.js code.

Android source code to show a popup dialog with a text field

I am working on a way to rapidly mock up Android applications using Android Studio, i.e., to rapidly prototype Android applications on the fly, and little snippets of code help to make this happen. For instance, this snippet of code shows how to show a popup dialog to prompt a user to enter information into a text field:

An Android Button click (tap) listener example

Android Button FAQ: How do I add a listener to a Button in Android?

To add a click (tap) listener to a button in Android, just get a reference to the button (typically using findViewById), then call the setOnClickListener method of the button, like this:

Mon, Jun 27, 2005 (Using location.href to move to another HTML page)

Here's a quick note for those of us that like to create prototypes during a requirements process using HTML. Whenever you want to create a button that is supposed to simulate the action of moving to another screen, you can use code similar to the following code snippet to simulate this behavior: