option

Scala: How to use higher-order functions with Option (instead of match expressions)

Table of Contents1 - Sample data2 - From match expressions to higher-order functions3 - Notes4 - Resources5 - Comments

I originally wrote a long introduction to this article about Scala Options, but I decided to keep that introduction for a future second article in this series. For this article I’ll just say:

  • idiomatic Scala code involves never using null values
  • because you never use nulls, it’s important for you to become an expert at using Option, Some, and None
  • initially you may want to use match expressions to handle Option values
  • as you become more proficient with Scala and Options, you’ll find that match expressions tend to be verbose
  • becoming proficient with higher-order functions (HOFs) like map, filter, fold, and many others are the cure for that verbosity

ScalaCheck custom generator examples

Table of Contents1 - Custom generators2 - Built-in ScalaCheck generators3 - How to use ScalaCheck generators4 - More ScalaCheck generators

Writing custom generators for ScalaCheck can be one of the more difficult and/or time-consuming parts of using it. As a result I thought I’d start putting together a list of generators that I have written or seen elsewhere. Unfortunately I can’t credit all the ones I’ve seen in other places because I google’d and copied them many moons ago, but I’ll give credit/attribution to all the ones I can.

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Custom generators

This is a combination of generators I wrote, and some that I copied from other places and may have modified a little:

Some Scala Exception ‘allCatch’ examples

At the time of this writing there aren’t many examples of the Scala Exception object allCatch method to be found, so I thought I’d share some examples here.

In each example I first show the "success" case, and then show the "failure" case. Other than that, I won’t explain these, but hopefully seeing them in the REPL will be enough to get you pointed in the right direction:

Scala: A look at flatMap and map on Option

As a quick Scala tip, if you haven’t worked with the flatMap on an Option much, it can help to know that flatMap’s function should return an Option, which you can see in this REPL example:

scala> Some(1).flatMap{ i => Option(i) }
res0: Option[Int] = Some(1)

You can tell this by looking at the function signature in the scaladoc for the flatMap method on the Option class:

Creating a drop-down list in Play Framework 2.6

As a brief note to self before I delete this code, this is how you create a drop-down list in Play Framework 2.6:

@* adding 'size to helper.select creates a select/option area (single or multi-select) *@
@helper.select(
    form("category"),
    categories,
    'id -> "category",
    '_help -> "Select one, any one"
)

In that code, categories is passed into the Play template like this: