replace

“I’m not here to replace anybody”

“I’m going to be the best Zach LaVine you guys can get,” he said. “That’s who I am. I’m not here to replace anybody. I’m here to become the next young guy coming in for the Chicago Bulls, work my butt off and take this back to where it should be. You can’t replace a guy when you’re not that person. I’m Zach LaVine. I’m going to play like me. I’m going to act like me and that’s just how I carry myself. I’m me.”

A Scala method to replace a few “bad” characters

Here’s a little Scala method I wrote to replace some “bad” characters that won’t print properly on my Radio Pi display:

def replaceBadCharacters(s: String): String = {
    s.replaceAll("“", "\"")
     .replaceAll("”", "\"")
     .replaceAll("‘", "\"")
     .replaceAll("’", "\"")
}

There are other ways to solve this problem, but I threw this together as a quick patch until I can figure out why the Phosphor screen saver on the Raspberry Pi won’t print those characters that I’m replacing.

Methods on the Scala collections classes, organized by category

When I wrote the Scala Cookbook, I gave each recipe and then each chapter my full attention. I thought that if I wrote each recipe as well as possible, and included important recipes in each chapter, well, I wanted each chapter to be worth the price of the entire book. That was my goal.

As a result of this effort -- and perhaps to the chagrin of my editor -- the Scala collections chapters ended up being 130 pages in length.

Scala: How to extract parts of a String that match regex patterns

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is Recipe 1.9, “Extracting Parts of a String that Match Patterns.”

Problem

You want to extract one or more parts of a Scala String that match the regular-expression patterns you specify.

Solution

Define the regular-expression (regex) patterns you want to extract, placing parentheses around them so you can extract them as “regular-expression groups.” First, define the desired pattern:

How to replace newline character with sed on Mac OS X (macOS)

I don’t have much time to explain this today, but ... if you want to see how to use the sed command on a Mac OS X (macOS) system to search for newline characters in the input pattern and replace them with something else in the replacement pattern, this example might point you in the right direction.

How to use multiple regex patterns with replaceAll (Java String class)

Table of Contents1 - 1) A simple string2 - 2) Replace multiple patterns in that string3 - 3) More explanation4 - Multiple search patterns5 - Summary

Java FAQ: How can I use multiple regular expression patterns with the replaceAll method in the Java String class?

Here’s a little example that shows how to replace many regular expression (regex) patterns with one replacement string in Scala and Java. I’ll show all of this code in Scala’s interactive interpreter environment, but in this case Scala is very similar to Java, so the initial solution can easily be converted to Java.

A Java method to replace all instances of a pattern in a String with a replacement pattern

Note: The code shown below is a bit old. If you want to perform a “search and replace” operation on all instances of a given pattern, all you have to do these days is use the replaceAll method on a Java String, like this:

String s = "123 Main Street";
String result = s.replaceAll("[0-9]", "-");

That second line of code returns the string “--- Main Street”. I kept the information below here for background information.

Solution to sed error message: “\1 not defined in the RE”

As a quick sed solution, if you get this “\1 not defined in the RE” error message when running a sed script:

$ sed -f sed.cmds c4.in.html > c4.out.html
sed: 2: sed.cmds: \1 not defined in the RE

the problem probably isn’t too bad. For me I usually get the error message when I forget to “escape” parentheses that I use in my search pattern. I usually write this, which is an error:

s/foo(.*)bar/\1/

when I need to write that sed command like this:

Mac OS X: Unix sed commands I use to clean MacDown HTML output

FWIW, this is the source code for a sed script I use on my Mac OS X system to convert HTML output generated by MacDown into a format I need. MacDown generates some extra “cruft” that I don’t need, so I use these sed commands to clean up that HTML output: