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Notes on looking at MacOS application/process memory usage alvin July 20, 2019 - 4:14pm

Very briefly, I spent a little time today trying to understand how much memory/RAM a Java/Swing application was really using, and these are my notes from that excursion. Note that the app is bundled as a MacOS/Java app I named AlPad, but from some system perspectives it is only seen by the name JavaAppLauncher. Here are my notes, which will hopefully be useful to me in the future:

A Scala “Word of the day” shell script

I have a 19" monitor on the counter between my kitchen and living room, and it’s powered by a Raspberry Pi. I use the Linux Phosphor screen saver to show a scrolling “news and stock ticker” on the display, which I’ve programmed to show news from several different sources (Atom and Rss feeds, along with other news and data sources). An old version of the display looks like this:

My Raspberry Pi news ticker display

Today I added a new “Word of the day” feature to the display, and as with all of the other code, I wrote a Scala shell script to generate the output.

Amazon Echo + Akka = Akkazon Ekko

Table of Contents1 - Running Ekko2 - Running Ekko commands3 - Listing commands Ekko understands4 - Written with Akka (and Scala)5 - Next steps6 - Add actors with reflection? (plugins)7 - The source code8 - More ...

I recently started working on a project that may or may not make it into my book on Scala and functional programming. I’m currently calling it “Akkazon Ekko” — or “Ekko” — because it’s a little like the Amazon Echo, but written with Scala and Akka.

An RSS Reader written with Scala and JavaFX (the beginning)

I just started writing an RSS Reader application using JavaFX and Scala, and I thought I’d post the initial code here. This code shows several advanced Scala techniques that Scala developers might need to use when writing Scala code to interact with Java, and in this case, JavaFX.

Scala: How to download and process XML data (such as an RSS feed)

I was looking for a good way to access XML resources (like RSS feeds) in Scala, and I currently like the idea of using ScalaJ-HTTP to access the URL and download the XML content, and then using the Scala XML library to process the XML string I download from the URL.

This example Scala program shows my current approach:

Trying RSS readers again

As a bit of an experiment, I’m trying a couple of RSS readers again. I got away from them for a while, but once you realize you have a series of interests that you want to keep up with, I think they make sense. They don’t give you the “discovery” aspect you find with other sources, but they’re good for consistency.

Important parts of a good RSS reader are being able to organize sources into folders, showing the RSS list and previews of each article, and being able to keep my lists in sync across multiple devices.

A Python script to read RSS feeds (and much more)

With the caveats that (a) I don’t know much about Python, (b) I don’t want to learn that much about it right now, and (c) I’m not concerned with performance at the moment, the following Python script does the following:

How to load an XML URL in Scala (contents of an XML web page)

Scala XML FAQ: How do I load an XML URL in Scala? (How do I read/download the contents of an XML URL in Scala?)

To load the contents of an XML URL (web page) in Scala, such as an RSS news feed or RESTful web service, just use the load method of the Scala XML class:

val xml = XML.load("http://www.devdaily.com/rss.xml")

Here's an example of what this looks like in the Scala REPL:

A Perl program to determine RSS readers from an Apache access log file

Perl/RSS FAQ: How many RSS subscribers do I have on my website?

Like many other people with a blog or website, I was curious yesterday about how many RSS readers/subscribers the devdaily website has. You can try to get this information in a variety of ways, but the real information is on your server, in your Apache log files.

To figure out how many RSS subscribers your website has, just go through your Apache log file, find all the records that look like this: