ssh

How to use the Linux ‘scp’ command without a password to make remote backups

Summary: How to create a public and private key pair to use ssh and scp without using a password, which lets you automate a remote server backup process.

Over the last two years I've ended up creating a large collection of websites and web applications on a variety of Linux servers that are hosted with different companies like GoDaddy and A2 Hosting. I recently embarked on a mission to automate the backup processes for all these sites, and as a result of this effort, I thought I'd share what I've learned here.

A2 Hosting review and support - Day 2 (2010)

A2 Hosting review 2010: After using GoDaddy web hosting services for the last four years, I just started using the A2 Hosting web hosting services yesterday. Here are my impressions so far.

A2 Hosting review - The initial experience

Buying the new domain name and paying for one year's hosting with A2 Hosting went normally. The nice A2 Hosting coupon (30% off with the phrase "JINGLE") was very nice, making the total price for the domain name and one year's hosting less than $70.

Private Git repository hosting services

Private Git hosting services FAQ: What companies offer Git hosting, in particular private Git hosting services?

I recently started looking for a private Git hosting service, and the obvious first place to look is GitHub. They provide free Git hosting for open source projects, and their service has been excellent. But when I looked at their private Git hosting service, I was really surprised by the cost of their plans. Their lowest price private Git hosting plan is $7/month, and that allows only five Git projects, and relatively little disk space. Since I want a private Git hosting service to store all my projects, I'd immediately need to go to one of their paid Git hosting plans, and their Git hosting prices go up quickly from there.

Update: Github has changed their policies significantly since I first wrote this article.

Test your Putty SSH tunnel and Firefox SOCKS proxy

(This is the final part of a four-part tutorial. Here's a link to the introduction.)

Step 5: Test your Putty SSH tunnel and Firefox SOCKS proxy

As an initial test of the tunnel just try to go to a website like google.com in Firefox. If everything has been configured right, and your Putty tunnel is up and running, you should connect just fine.

Configure Firefox to use the Putty SSH tunnel as a SOCKS proxy

(This is Part 3 of a four-part tutorial. Here's a link to the introduction.)

Step 4: Configure Firefox to use the Putty SSH tunnel as a SOCKS proxy

Configuring Firefox to use this new SSH tunnel is simple. Start Firefox, then select the Tools menu, and then select the Options... menu item. Now click the Advanced icon (on the upper-right of the dialog), and then select the Network tab. This is shown in the next figure:

Configuring a tunnel to your SSH server

(This is Part 2 of a four-part tutorial. Here's a link to the introduction.)

Step 3: Configuring a tunnel to your SSH server

Next, we'll use Putty to create an SSH tunnel and connect to your remote server. For the purposes of this example let's assume we are connecting to a site named "myremotesshserver.com".

When you start Putty you should see a window that looks like the next figure:

Linux tutorial, part 3 (ssh, cd, ls, cp, mv)

Logging in to a remote system

To login to that system I'll use a command named ssh, which stands for "secure shell". It's basically an encrypted login session to a remote system. To login to that remote system I'll type this command in my terminal window:

ssh al@foo.bar.com

(Of course everything after the ssh command there is made up. I don't have a login account on any systems named anything like that.)