try

A Scala method to run any block of code slowly

The book, Advanced Scala with Cats, has a nice little function you can use to run a block of code “slowly”:

def slowly[A](body: => A) = try body finally Thread.sleep(100)

I’d never seen a try/finally block written like that (without a catch clause), so it was something new for the brain.

In the book they run a factorial method slowly, like this:

slowly(factorial(n - 1).map(_ * n))

FWIW, you can modify slowly to pass in the length of time to sleep, like this:

def slowly[A](body: => A, sleepTime: Long) = try body finally Thread.sleep(sleepTime)
Scala exception handling (try/catch/finally and more) alvin March 10, 2018 - 12:51pm

Scala FAQ: How do I handle exceptions in Scala?

Solution: Basic exception handling in Scala is handled with its try/catch/finally syntax. (See the end of this article for links to tutorials on advanced exception handling in Scala.)

Here’s an example of Scala’s try/catch/finally syntax:

Functional error handling in Scala

Because functional programming is like algebra, there are no null values or exceptions. But of course you can still have exceptions when you try to access servers that are down or files that are missing, so what can you do? This lesson demonstrates the techniques of functional error handling in Scala.

The beginning of a Scala “FileUtils” class

In production code I recommend that you use a good “Files” library like Apache Commons IO, but if you want to create your own Scala FileUtils class, here’s some source code that can help you get started.

First, here’s some code for the FileUtils class (an object, technically):

Scala: Handling nested Options with flatMap and for

Summary: In this article I show a couple of ways to extract information from optional fields in your Scala domain models. This example is a little contrived, but if you have a situation where one Option instance contains one or more other Options, this article may be helpful.

There are times when you’re creating your domain model when it makes sense to use optional fields in your case classes. For instance, when you model an Address, the “second street address” isn’t needed for all people, so making it an optional field makes sense:

I’m amazed by people are afraid to make a mistake alvin March 25, 2017 - 12:25pm

I’m amazed/saddened by people who are so afraid of making a mistake that they come up with a million different reasons as excuses to justify why something can’t be done. They always say, “I would do XYZ, but ...”

All I can think to say to them is, “Quit thinking and just do it.” Or, as Cher said in Moonstruck, “Snap out of it!”

Really, what’s the worst thing that’s going to happen? You’re going to die? Well, I have news for you, no matter what you do, you’re going to die anyway. (I’ve gone unconscious seven times over the last couple of years, and believe me, at that point there’s nothing you can do about it.)

Scala best practice: How to use the Option/Some/None pattern

Table of Contents1 - Problem2 - Solution3 - Returning an Option from a method4 - Getting the value from an Option5 - Using Option with Scala collections6 - Using Option with other frameworks7 - Using Try, Success, and Failure8 - Using Either, Left, and Right9 - Discussion10 - Don’t use the get method with Option11 - See Also12 - The Scala Cookbook

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is Recipe 20.6, “Scala best practice: How to use the Option/Some/None pattern.”

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Problem

For a variety of reasons, including removing null values from your Scala code, you want to use what I call the Option/Some/None pattern. Or, if you’re interested in a problem (exception) that occurred while processing code, you may want to return Try/Success/Failure from a method instead of Option/Some/None.

How to open and read text files in Scala

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is Recipe 12.1, “How to open and read a text file in Scala.”

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Problem

You want to open a plain-text file in Scala and process the lines in that file.

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Solution

There are two primary ways to open and read a text file:

Table of Contents

  1. Problem
  2. Solution
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