actor

Stuart Margolin and Northern Exposure

I watched an episode of Northern Exposure recently and at the end of it I was surprised to see that Stuart Margolin directed the episode. I always enjoyed his characters on The Rockford Files and M*A*S*H, and I remembered seeing him on Magnum, P.I., but I didn’t know anything else about his career, including that he was a director. After reading his Wikipedia entry I hope at some point to see the episode of 30 Rock he did with Alan Alda.

How to write Akka Actors: An example video game

Way back in 2013 — before my first fake heart attack followed by learning that I had thyroid cancer — I thought I was about to go “back to work”, and I decided to try to write another visual demo of Akka Actors before I went back to work. I gave myself 10 hours to write something, and at first I decided to just create some bubbles that would move about randomly on screen. But I got that working so fast that I decided to do something else.

Eventually I came up with the idea of a little “kill the bubbles” game, which turned into a “kill the characters” game. This video shows how it works:

In Erlang, processes share no memory and interact only by sending messages alvin June 18, 2017 - 11:28am

“In Erlang, processes share no memory and can interact with each other only by sending messages. This is exactly how objects in the real world behave.”

An Akka actors ‘remote’ example

While doing some crazy things with SARAH, I realized that the best way to solve a particular problem was to use remote Akka actors. I haven’t had the opportunity to work with Akka much since finishing the Scala Cookbook, so I dug around trying to find a simple Akka remote “Hello, world” example. Unable to find a good one, I read some stuff, and created it myself.

Why we can easily distribute Erlang programs over multicores or networks alvin August 9, 2016 - 8:55pm

“In Erlang it’s OK to mutate state within an individual process but not for one process to tinker with the state of another process ... processes interact by one method, and one method only, by exchanging messages. Processes share no data with other processes. This is the reason why we can easily distribute Erlang programs over multicores or networks.”

Joe Armstrong, in the book Programming Erlang