actor

How to write Akka Actors: An example video game

Way back in 2013 — before my first fake heart attack followed by learning that I had thyroid cancer — I thought I was about to go “back to work”, and I decided to try to write another visual demo of Akka Actors before I went back to work. I gave myself 10 hours to write something, and at first I decided to just create some bubbles that would move about randomly on screen. But I got that working so fast that I decided to do something else.

Eventually I came up with the idea of a little “kill the bubbles” game, which turned into a “kill the characters” game. This video shows how it works:

An Akka actors ‘remote’ example

While doing some crazy things with SARAH, I realized that the best way to solve a particular problem was to use remote Akka actors. I haven’t had the opportunity to work with Akka much since finishing the Scala Cookbook, so I dug around trying to find a simple Akka remote “Hello, world” example. Unable to find a good one, I read some stuff, and created it myself.

Why we can easily distribute Erlang programs over multicores or networks

“In Erlang it’s OK to mutate state within an individual process but not for one process to tinker with the state of another process ... processes interact by one method, and one method only, by exchanging messages. Processes share no data with other processes. This is the reason why we can easily distribute Erlang programs over multicores or networks.”

Joe Armstrong, in the book Programming Erlang

Scala best practices (idioms) (from the Scala Cookbook)

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is the introduction to Chapter 20, _Idioms_ (Scala best practices).

When I first came to Scala from Java, I was happy with the small things, including eliminating a lot of ;, (), and {} characters, and writing more concise, Ruby-like code. These were nice little wins that made for “a better Java.”