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How to fire Mac OS X notifications with AppleScript (and Scala)

Table of Contents1 - A “Hello, world” MacOS AppleScript notification2 - AppleScript: Mac notification with a sound3 - How to add a title and subtitle to your notification4 - Running from Scala or Java5 - See also6 - Summary

Summary: This tutorial demonstrates how to fire MacOS system notifications with AppleScript (and Scala or Java).

In this article I assume that you already know at least a little bit about how to use AppleScript, and just want to know how to trigger a MacOS notification. At the end of the tutorial I show how to invoke the AppleScript code using Scala and Java.

How to run a Unix shell script from the Mac Finder alvin May 3, 2013 - 7:33am

If you ever want to create a Unix shell script that you can give to someone else so they can double-click it and run it through the Mac OS X Finder, all you have to do is (a) name the file with the ".command" extension and (b) make it executable. So, just name your Mac/Unix script like this:

ShowProcesses.command

Then make it executable, like this:

chmod +x ShowProcesses.command

You can also leave out the usual #!/bin/sh part on the first line.

A Scala shell script example (and discussion)

Scala shell script FAQ: How do I create a Unix/Linux shell script to run a small Scala script?

If you want to run a Scala script as a Unix or Linux shell script -- such as hello.sh -- write your script like this:

The Scala Process and ProcessBuilder classes (API documentation)

At the time of this writing, you can't easily find the Scala Process and ProcessBuilder classes (the Scala API documentation), so in an effort to help you (and the search engines) find those classes more easily, here are direct links to them:

How to execute (exec) external system commands in Scala

Scala exec FAQ: How do I execute external system commands in Scala?

When it comes to executing external system commands, Scala is a dramatic improvement over Java. The operators Scala makes available are much more like Perl or Ruby, and the operators themselves are consistent with traditional shell commands, and are therefore easy to remember. Let's take a look at a few examples.