extreme programming

Kent Beck’s Four Rules of Software Design (also known as “Simple Design”)

For the first time in many years I just came across Kent Beck’s Four Rules of Software Design:

  1. Passes the tests
  2. Reveals intention (should be easy to understand)
  3. No duplication (DRY)
  4. Fewest elements (remove anything that doesn’t serve the three previous rules)

There are wording variations on those rules, but I got those specific words from this Martin Fowler post. As he notes, “The rules are in priority order, so ‘passes the tests’ takes priority over ‘reveals intention.’”

For more information on Kent Beck’s Four Rules of Software Design, see that link, or this link to the original rules on c2.com.

eXtreme Programming Bill of Rights

eXtreme Programming taught us that customers, programmers, and managers have certain “rights” on software development projects. As copied from this article, those “Bill of Rights” are listed below.

Three jobs software developers perform (and one they're qualified for)

Nothing major here, but there's an interesting story in the MIT Tech Review this month about three jobs they must do at the same time, but most developers are only qualified for one of the three. According to the article, the three jobs they must perform are: