linux mint

How to install Java, Scala, and SBT on Linux Mint alvin May 19, 2017 - 7:27pm

Lately I’ve been in the process of “making the switch” from macOS to Linux Mint, and to that end, I just installed the Java 8 JDK/SDK, Scala 2.12, and SBT 0.13 on a new Linux Mint system, and I want to note here how I did that while it’s still fresh in my mind. Here are my notes in a compact form.

Update: Possible alternative

I haven’t looked into this yet, but it may be possible (and easier) to install OpenJDK rather than Oracle’s version of Java (which I describe below). I describe that process on my notes on how to configure a new Ubuntu server, but the basic command to install the OpenJDK JRE is:

apt-get install default-jre

and the command to install the OpenJDK JDK/SDK is:

apt-get install default-jdk

Cerebro, a Spotlight-like launcher for Linux

I recently “made the switch” from MacOS to Linux Mint, and was lamenting the fact that I didn’t have Alfred on Mint. But then this morning I learned about Cerebro, which, if it’s not Alfred yet, at least it’s Spotlight for Linux. omgubuntu.co.uk has this good intro article on Cerebro.

Cerebro is written as an Electron app, and as a result it’s available not only for Linux, but Windows and MacOS as well.

Linux Mint (and Ubuntu): Suspend vs Hibernate (meaning)

When I put Linux Mint on a few of my computers recently I quickly encountered the words “suspend” and “hibernate” when attempting to put a laptop to sleep:

LInux Mint, Suspend vs Hibernate

“What the heck is the difference between Suspend and Hibernate,” I wondered. “I’m used to just having a ‘Sleep’ option on my MacBook Pro.”

Lesson learned from Apple: Keep innovating, or die

One lesson learned from Apple recently is that if your products stagnate people will start to look around, and when they do that they may spend their money elsewhere.

As just one small example of this, iOS got boring for me, so I started looking around and bought an Android tablet instead of a new iPad. These days the Mac and macOS feel stagnant — or worse than that, moving in the wrong direction by removing features like Spaces — so I’m looking at desktop alternatives as well.

2018 Update: As a result of macOS moving in the wrong direction (IMHO), I now have have a laptop and desktop that run Linux Mint.

How to use the Linux lsof command to list open files

Linux “open files” FAQ: Can you share some examples of how to show “open files” on a Linux system (i.e., how to use the lsof command)?

The Linux lsof command lists information about files that are open by processes running on the system. (The lsof command itself stands for “list of open files.”) In this brief article I’ll just share some lsof command examples. If you have any questions, just let me know.

Linux: How to get CPU and memory information

Linux FAQ: How can I find Linux processor and memory information? (Also written as, How can I find Linux CPU information?, How can I find Linux RAM information?)

To see what type of processor/CPU your computer system has, use this Linux processor command:

cat /proc/cpuinfo

As you can see, all you have to do is use the Linux cat command on a special file on your Linux system. (See below for sample processor output.)

To see your Linux memory information and memory stats use this command: