grep

A big collection of Unix/Linux 'find' command examples

Linux/Unix FAQ: Can you share some Linux find command examples?

Sure. The Unix/Linux find command is very powerful. It can search the entire filesystem to find files and directories according to the search criteria you specify. Besides using the find command to locate files, you can also execute other Linux commands (grep, mv, rm, etc.) on the files and directories you find, which makes find extremely powerful.

Linux: Recursive file searching with grep -r (like grep + find)

Linux grep FAQ: How can I perform a recursive search with the grep command in Linux?

Solution: find + grep

For years I always used variations of the following Linux find and grep commands to recursively search subdirectories for files that match a grep pattern:

find . -type f -exec grep -l 'alvin' {} \;

This command can be read as, “Search all files in all subdirectories of the current directory for the string ‘alvin’, and print the filenames that contain this pattern.” It’s an extremely powerful approach for recursively searching files in all subdirectories that match the pattern I specify.

Using find and grep to print lines before and after what you’re searching for

A cool thing about the Unix/Linux grep command is that you can show lines before and after a pattern match with the -B and -A options. As an example, I just used this combination of find and grep to search for all Scala files under the current directory that contain the string null. This command prints five lines before and after each null line in each file:

$ find . -type f -name "*.scala" -exec grep -B5 -A5 null {} \;

That’s good stuff, but it prints a really long list of lines, and I can’t tell the output of one file from another. To fix this, I put the following code in a file named helper.sh, and made it executable:

A large collection of Unix/Linux ‘grep’ command examples

Linux grep commands FAQ: Can you share some Linux/Unix grep command examples?

Sure. The name grep means "general regular expression parser", but you can think of the grep command as a "search" command for Unix and Linux systems: it's used to search for text strings and more-complicated "regular expressions" within one or more files.

I think it's easiest to learn how to use the grep command by showing examples, so let's dive right in.

How to tell grep to ignore special characters in a string (solution)

Back in the old days I thought that any pattern that was including in single-quotes with the Unix grep command meant that the pattern inside the string was completely ignored by grep. But these days I have to escape special characters with a backslash character, which is really annoying. This example shows what I mean:

How to search multiple jar files for a string or pattern (shell script)

Here’s a Unix shell script that I use to search Java Jar files for any type of string pattern. You can use it to search for the name of a class, the name of a package, or any other string/pattern that will show up if you manually ran jar tvf on each jar file. The advantage of this script — if you’re a Unix, Linux, or Cygwin user — is that it will search through all jar files in the current directory:

A collection of 75+ free Linux tutorials alvin November 15, 2011 - 9:42am

Free Unix and Linux tutorials: Wow, this blog post makes me feel a little old. As I've been working on reorganizing the website lately, I found that I've written more than seventy-five Unix and Linux tutorials. To try to make them easier to find, I created this page to link most of them up.

So, to that end, here is a list of at least 75 free Unix and Linux tutorials I've written. I hope you enjoy them, and I hope they're helpful.

An `egrep` example with multiple regular expressions

Summary: How to use the Linux egrep command with multiple regular expressions (regex patterns).

As a quick note here today, I just used the Linux egrep command to perform a case-insensitive search on multiple regular expressions (regex patterns). Really, what I did was a little more complicated:

locate -i calendar | grep Users | egrep -vi 'twiki|gif|shtml|drupal-7|java|PNG'

As you can see from that command, I did this:

Perl grep array FAQ - How to search an array/list of strings

Perl "grep array" FAQ: Can you demonstrate a Perl grep array example? (Related: Can you demonstrate how to search a Perl array?)

A very cool thing about Perl is that you can search lists (arrays) with the Perl grep function. This makes it very easy to find things in large lists -- without having to write your own Perl for/foreach loops.

A Perl array 'contains' example

Perl array FAQ: How can I test to see if a Perl array already contains a given value? (Also written as, How do I search an array with the Perl grep function?)

I use the Perl grep function to see if a Perl array contains a given entry. For instance, in this Perl code: