table

How to use a non-default table column separator in Asciidoc

As a brief note, if you ever need to use a different column separator when creating a table in Asciidoc, you can do so by specific the separator field in the table preamble.

For example, in the following Asciidoc table I can’t use the default pipe character | to separate the table columns, because I need to use that character in the content inside the table, so I set the separator character to be : instead:

<<methods_to_combine_cmds>> lists the ...

.Methods to combine external commands
[[methods_to_combine_cmds]]
[cols=",",options="header",separator=:,]
|===============================
:Methods :Description
:`cmd1 #| cmd2`  :The output of the first ...
:`cmd1 ### cmd2` :`cmd1` and `cmd2` will be ...
:`cmd1 #> cmd2`  :Normally used to write to ...
:`cmd1 #&& cmd2` :Run `cmd2` if `cmd1` runs ...
:`cmd1 #|| cmd2` :Run `cmd2` if `cmd1` ...
:`cmd1 #&& cmd2 #|| cmd3` :Run `cmd2` is ...
|===============================

I shortened that content so you don’t have to read through all the non-essential text, but the image shows the actual resulting Asciidoc table.

For more information, this asciidoctor.org URL was the most helpful resource for me. This other page shows how you can specify format="csv" to create a table from a CSV-style syntax.

In summary, if you needed to see how to create an Asciidoc table with a non-default table column separator, I hope this example is helpful.

Using a SQLite date/time field with Flutter and Dart alvin September 14, 2019 - 1:29pm

As a brief note, SQLite doesn’t have date/time (datetime) fields, so when you want to use a datetime field with Flutter (and Dart), you have to do something else.

My choice was to store my datetime data as a SQLite INTEGER field. I did this so I can query and sort that field easily myself. (The benefit of storing a datetime field as a TEXT field is that you can read it easier, but I think an INTEGER field is a little easier to work with, though YMMV.)

How to use SQL SELECT, GROUP BY, ORDER BY, and COUNT (all in one)

Don’t tell anyone, but my SQL skills are pretty average these days, at best, mostly because I haven’t had to do anything hard in a while. But just now I was happy to write this little SQL SELECT query that does a GROUP BY, an ORDER BY, and a COUNT, yielding the results shown in the image:

select nid, count(nid) from term_node
where tid in (3,1,11,10,9,8,7)
group by nid
order by count(nid) DESC

I’m going to use this query — or one very similar to it — to get a list of nodes (nid) that have the most tag ids (tid) from the list of tid in the query. In theory, the nodes (blog posts) that have the most tags in common should be the most related to each other. So, in my Scrupal6 replacement for Drupal 6, this query is a way to get “related” content for a given blog post. (The tid list shown comes from node id 4, so I need to also exclude nid=4 from the results. I also need to add a limit clause to the query.)

If you ever need to do a group by, order by, and count in one SQL query, I hope this example is helpful.

How to search for a string in all fields of every table in a MySQL database

Here’s a cool tip: if you want to search for a text string in all fields of all tables of a MySQL database, you can use phpMyAdmin to do this very easily. Here are the steps to search every MySQL/MariaDB database table.

1) Select the desired database

The first step is to select the database you want to search. Don’t select a table — just select the database you want to search. (If you select a table you’ll get a different search form in Step 2.)

Getting started converting documents with Pandoc

I’m looking into producing my Scala/FP book as a PDF, and as part of that I have been looking into Pandoc. With the exception of converting HTML tables into other formats such as Markdown or LaTeX, Pandoc has been working well so far.

Here are a couple of Pandoc commands to show you how easy this is:

How to list MySQL database table column names without the table formatting

If you want to list all of the MySQL database table column names (field names) as a simple list of names, with each column name listed on a separate line, just follow these steps.

First, start MySQL with the -sN options, like this:

$ mysql -sN -u root -p

Then execute a query like this:

Scala: A quick look at the Slick database library

This is an excerpt from the Scala Cookbook (partially modified for the internet). This is Recipe 16.9, “A quick look at the Slick database library.”

MySQL Java mappings (Decimal to BigDecimal, etc.)

As I get back into working with a MySQL database in a Java (Scala, actually) development project and also in adding functionality to Cato, I found these MySQL to Java data type mappings, via this link: