test

Use Case best practice: Test your Use Cases with real data

Quite often when I’m asked to review a UML “Use Case” that someone else has written, I ask “Have you tested your Use Case with real data?” Sadly, the answer is usually “no.”

I don’t know why people don’t do this, but they don’t, and it seems like a very logical thing — essentially a unit test for Use Cases.

Fifty Shades of Mast Cell Activation Disease (MCAD/MCAS)

Notes from September 24, 2016:

Doctor: I’d like to collect a bone marrow sample ...

*Al runs out of the hospital in a hospital gown, screaming like a little girl*


(later, after they caught me)

Doctor: The next time you break out in a rash, hives, or blisters, I want you to have those biopsied.

Me: Is there going to be any part of our relationship that doesn’t involve a lot of pain on my part?

Doc: Yes, pee in this cup, and we’ll look at it under a fluorescent light to see if you have the same disease that King George III had.

Me: The crazy one?

Doc: Yes.

Me: Cool.

Solution: When AndroidManifest.xml changes aren’t seen in your Flutter dev/test app

As a brief note, if you’re developing an Android app with Flutter and then find that the changes you made to your AndroidManifest.xml file aren’t being seen in your app, you’ll probably need to uninstall your dev/test app and completely reinstall it with flutter run. I just ran into this problem while working with flutter_local_notifications — which requires changes to AndroidManifest.xml to work properly — and uninstalling and reinstalling the app fixed the problem.

ScalaCheck custom generator examples

Table of Contents1 - Custom generators2 - Built-in ScalaCheck generators3 - How to use ScalaCheck generators4 - More ScalaCheck generators

Writing custom generators for ScalaCheck can be one of the more difficult and/or time-consuming parts of using it. As a result I thought I’d start putting together a list of generators that I have written or seen elsewhere. Unfortunately I can’t credit all the ones I’ve seen in other places because I google’d and copied them many moons ago, but I’ll give credit/attribution to all the ones I can.

Back to top

Custom generators

This is a combination of generators I wrote, and some that I copied from other places and may have modified a little:

JMH, an SBT plugin for running OpenJDK JMH benchmarks

JMH is an SBT plugin for running OpenJDK JMH benchmarks. Per its docs, “JMH is a Java harness for building, running, and analysing nano/micro/milli/macro benchmarks written in Java and other languages targeting the JVM.”

They also recommend reading an article titled Nanotrusting the Nanotime if you’re interested in writing your own benchmark tests.