imac

MacOS softwareupdate command (how to ignore updates)

I just learned that MacOS has a softwareupdate command, and further learned that it has a --ignore option, which may or may not let you ignore useless updates. For example, my Mac prompts me daily to update Keynote, Numbers, and Pages, which I rarely (rarely!) use, so I don’t want to bother updating them. I’m hoping the a softwareupdate command will help me with this.

How to type smart quotes on Ubuntu Linux

Table of Contents1 - Background: Switching from MacOS to Ubuntu2 - Background: AltGr and Compose keys3 - Step 1: Figure out what the Compose key is4 - How to type smart quotes on Ubuntu (the hard way)5 - Note: You can stop here6 - Using Ubuntu macros to make it easier7 - Mapping keystrokes to xdotool commands8 - Summary

Note: I don’t know why, but all of the images for this article have been lost. I’ll replace them when I have some free time (but free time is scarce these days).

There seem to be a few different ways to type “smart quotes” on Ubuntu Linux, including using keys (keystrokes) like AltGr and Compose. In this tutorial I’ll document an approach that works best for me: creating macros I can assign to simple keystrokes rather than having to use more-complicated keystrokes.

Ubuntu running on a 2008 27” iMac

As shown in the image, I just installed Ubuntu on my 2008 27” iMac. The UI is interesting, a combination of MacOS and Windows. From what I’ve seen, I think I’ll like the Ubuntu UI (Unity) more than Linux Mint, but I’m open. So far Ubuntu is also significantly faster than the latest versions of MacOS were on the same hardware, though that may be because MacOS had a few hundred thousand more files on it than Ubuntu has at the moment.

Mac exodus?

I haven’t been blown away by MacOS (nee OS X) in quite some time, and the latest MacBook design seems to have annoyed even more developers. A good thing about this is that it got me looking into Qubes OS, “a reasonably secure operating system.”

Apple’s philosophy of “we design the hardware and software” works well when people like your work, but when people don’t like your design it’s easy to lose customers.

Lil iMac - 120 days later

As an indicator of how weird my life has been lately, back on December 1, 2015 I bought a new, little iMac. The most important things in my life at that time were that I wanted to be able to run Sarah, and I wanted to be able to run a series of new stock market apps I had written, and my old 2007 iMac wasn’t cutting it any more.

Then my mom had an accident and ended up in the hospital for eleven days with a head injury. Then I ended up in the hospital myself. She was on the 3rd floor and I was on the 4th floor, or vice-versa, I don’t remember, I was pretty out of it. After that there was a long series of doctors’ appointments and tests. Now, about 120 days later, Lil iMac still sits there in its original box. Funny how priorities can change so fast.

Retro iMac 2002 to 2004 model (iMac G4)

One thing I wish Apple would do is to come out with a “retro iMac” version, using this style that they used in the 2002 through 2004 iMac design:

iMac G4

An iMac design like this would be perfect for my kitchen area, especially if it had a touchscreen.