life

Steve Jobs: “Remembering that I’ll be dead soon”

In terms of being a nice person, Steve Jobs may have been the worst Buddhist in the history of the world, but he captures the Zen/Buddhist essence in this quote:

“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

Photo from forbes.com, words from Steve Jobs.

If we think we want to get joy for ourselves ...

“If we think we want to get joy for ourselves, we realize that it’s very shortsighted, short-lived. Joy is the reward, really, of seeking to give joy to others. When you show compassion, when you show caring, when you show love to others, do things for others, in a wonderful way you have a deep joy that you can get in no other way.”

“You can’t buy it with money. You can be the richest person on Earth, but if you care only about yourself, I can bet my bottom dollar you will not be happy and joyful. But when you are caring, compassionate, more concerned about the welfare of others than about your own, wonderfully, wonderfully, you suddenly feel a warm glow in your heart, because you have, in fact, wiped the tears from the eyes of another.”

~ Archbishop Desmond Tutu, in The Book of Joy

Notes from February 4, 2018 (decision journals, Mayan civilization, more)

Farnam Street has been an interesting blog lately, including this post about keeping a decision journal, and this post about the rules of the road of investing.

In other news, bbc.com reports that researchers have found a sprawling Maya network discovered under a Guatemalan jungle.

sixcolors.com has a nice pie chart that shows how Apple makes its money (hint: 70% comes from the iPhone, 7% from the Mac).

inc.com has this article, 21 questions Amazon asks its job candidates.

Finally, here’s a series of tweets where Alastair McAlpine “asked some of my terminal paediatric palliative care patients what they had enjoyed in life, and what gave it meaning.” (Highly recommended reading.)

Consciousness and joy am I

I have no name, I have no life, I breathe no vital air.
No elements have molded me, no bodily sheath is my lair.
I have no speech, no hands and feet, nor means of evolution.
Consciousness and joy am I, and bliss in dissolution.

~ from the book, Light on Yoga

Look, I have no illusions, okay? I know how it’s gonna end for me.

“Look, I have no illusions, okay? I know that the life I live ... I know how it’s gonna end for me. Whatever. I’m okay with that. But I wanted you to know ... that when I do picture myself happy ... it’s with you.”

(Dean)

Two quotes from Daliy Stoic

“No man can have a peaceful life who thinks too much about lengthening it.” ~ Seneca

“There is a limit to the time assigned you, and if you don’t use it to free yourself, it will be gone and never return.” ~ Marcus Aurelius

Enjoying whatever time we have left

Stopped off to do a little bowling on the way to the grocery yesterday. I’m rolling the ball about 21-23 mph. Next to me, a little old man with an oxygen tank strapped onto his back is rolling maybe 10 mph, but with a really nice hook. He’d throw a few balls, then rest for a while, then throw a few more. We had some good conversations, but the best was about enjoying whatever time we have left.

~ November 2, 2013

The most important lesson I learned from aimlessly wandering around

Probably the most important lesson I learned from aimlessly wandering around for five years is that if you treat complete strangers as brothers and sisters that you’re meeting for the first time, the world magically becomes a better place.

Real marriage is when ...

“Real marriage is when two individuals share the same goals in life, and want to help each other attain those goals.”

~ Swami Satchidananda