store

Passing out at an ice cream shop

I was just reminded of a “funny” event from the worst of the mast cell activation disease days (before doctors knew what I had). I was just released from the hospital for something — maybe from my second fake heart attack, I don’t remember for sure — and I thought, “If I’m going to die before they figure out what’s wrong with me, I’d like to have a chocolate milk shake.”

So I drove to a placed called Sweet Cow in Louisville, Colorado, ordered a milkshake, and then began going unconscious before the order could even be completed. While the poor guy was making my shake I walked out of the store, sat on a bench outside, and put my head between my legs, hoping I wouldn’t pass out. The guy who was making my shake was probably only in high school, and he eventually brought the shake out to me while I sat there with my head between my legs. We had some sort of conversation, the gist of which was I was trying not to pass out and him saying that the milkshake was free.

With the help of a few people I eventually stumbled out of there and made it home. Such was life with the worst of the mast cell disease.

P.S. — These days I’m much better, thank you.

New book on Fred Meyer

I know “Fred Meyer” as the chain of grocery stores in Alaska that are now owned by Kroger. (Although I currently live in Colorado, I still have my Fred Meyer card.) It turns out that the real Fred Meyer was born Fritz Grubmeyer in Germany, and was a “relentless” business person (putting it nicely). The adn.com website reports that there is a new book out about him, and offers this summary.

This photo is of the Fred Meyer grocery store in Palmer, Alaska, where I used to shop. If you walked straight forward towards those mountains about four blocks and then took a right turn, that’s where I lived.

Sencha ExtJS Grid with autoLoad Store never loads data

Lesson learned yesterday: Never use Sencha ExtJS autoLoad, especially when working with a Grid panel. I ran into a problem where my grids kept showing a “loading” message, but never loaded the data. Or, more accurately, I should say that they rarely loaded the data. Sometimes they would load the data, but I could never get them to load the data consistently. Then I found this solution, which seems to work well.

Disabling extra Sencha ExtJS and Touch REST URL parameters

When you first work with a Sencha ExtJS or Touch Store and Proxy, you’ll quickly find that when you create GET and POST REST services, by default the store/proxy adds extra parameters to the end of the URLs you’re accessing.

Sencha ExtJS - How to properly use the Store load method

I can tell you from my own recent experience that if you don’t use the Sencha ExtJS Store load method properly, nothing will happen. After torturing myself twice by mishandling the load method, I thought maybe it would help if I wrote a quick blog post about how to properly use the load method.

Sencha ExtJS Store “findRecord” query examples

Here are a few short examples of how to find an object in a Sencha Store (ExtJS or Sencha Touch).

As a first example, imagine that you have a Store of users, and want to find a user with the first name of “Alvin”. Assuming that your user model has a field named firstName, your query would look like this:

var user = usersStore.findRecord('firstName', 'Alvin');

After this query you can use the user object just as though you had created it by hand. (The object returned is a Model instance.)