ubuntu

Optimizing Linux for slow computers

This is a link to an article titled, “Optimizing Linux for slow computers.” Note that this article links to this more thorough resource on archlinux.org.

Here are a couple of paragraphs from it:

When tuning a server, you'll really want to tweak for performance and high throughput. That's where most Linux configurations really shine over the competition: they come better tuned to get the most out of server configurations.

How to type smart quotes on Ubuntu Linux

Table of Contents1 - Background: Switching from MacOS to Ubuntu2 - Background: AltGr and Compose keys3 - Step 1: Figure out what the Compose key is4 - How to type smart quotes on Ubuntu (the hard way)5 - Note: You can stop here6 - Using Ubuntu macros to make it easier7 - Mapping keystrokes to xdotool commands8 - Summary

Note: I don’t know why, but all of the images for this article have been lost. I’ll replace them when I have some free time (but free time is scarce these days).

There seem to be a few different ways to type “smart quotes” on Ubuntu Linux, including using keys (keystrokes) like AltGr and Compose. In this tutorial I’ll document an approach that works best for me: creating macros I can assign to simple keystrokes rather than having to use more-complicated keystrokes.

An Ubuntu screensaver shell script to rotate images

This is a Bash shell script written for Ubuntu (Linux). I just switched from Mac/MacOS to Ubuntu, and I don't like the default blank screensaver in Ubuntu. I just want a screensaver to rotate my collection of images, so I'm considering using this rather than Xscreensaver. The script comes from jamcnaughton.com.

Ubuntu running on a 2008 27” iMac

As shown in the image, I just installed Ubuntu on my 2008 27” iMac. The UI is interesting, a combination of MacOS and Windows. From what I’ve seen, I think I’ll like the Ubuntu UI (Unity) more than Linux Mint, but I’m open. So far Ubuntu is also significantly faster than the latest versions of MacOS were on the same hardware, though that may be because MacOS had a few hundred thousand more files on it than Ubuntu has at the moment.

Customizing Ubuntu with themes alvin January 12, 2017 - 10:31am

This image is from an article about Ubuntu named, How to make your desktop look like my desktop. makeuseof.com has another article on customizing the Ubuntu UI with themes.

How to use the Linux lsof command to list open files

Linux “open files” FAQ: Can you share some examples of how to show “open files” on a Linux system (i.e., how to use the lsof command)?

The Linux lsof command lists information about files that are open by processes running on the system. (The lsof command itself stands for “list of open files.”) In this brief article I’ll just share some lsof command examples. If you have any questions, just let me know.

Linux: How to get CPU and memory information

Linux FAQ: How can I find Linux processor and memory information? (Also written as, How can I find Linux CPU information?, How can I find Linux RAM information?)

To see what type of processor/CPU your computer system has, use this Linux processor command:

cat /proc/cpuinfo

As you can see, all you have to do is use the Linux cat command on a special file on your Linux system. (See below for sample processor output.)

To see your Linux memory information and memory stats use this command: