code

A little Scala program to count lines of source code in the Scala Cookbook

As a little mini-project I wanted to count the number of lines of source code in the Second Edition of the Scala Cookbook as compared to the First Edition. To do this I wrote the following Scala program/script to count the lines between the ---- and .... sections in the AsciiDoc files that represent the old and new versions of the book:

Quotes from Clean Code

Back in 2013 I read the book Clean Code by Robert C. Martin, and in an effort to keep that book alive with me a little while longer, I decided to make my own “Cliffs Notes” version of the book on this page. One of my favorite notes from below is that a language named LOGO used the keyword to in the same way that Scala uses def, so a method named double would be defined as to double... instead of def double..., which seems like it would help developers name methods better.

Making wrong code look wrong (Joel on Software)

A long time ago — 2005, to be exact — I read this article named Making wrong code look wrong, and it was a big influence on me. These days I don’t know how many people use variable naming conventions, but when working on web applications I still like the “us” (unsafe) and “s” (safe) convention for handling user input. As Joel Spolsky discusses in that article, that convention has a good way of making wrong software code look wrong.

Scala idiom: Prefer immutable code (immutable data structures)

(I originally wrote this blog post in 2012, and it seems like it has held up well over time.)

One great thing I’ve learned from Scala and functional programming over the last few months is this: 

Make your variables immutable, unless there’s a good reason not to.

“Immutable” means that you can’t change (mutate) your variables; you mark them as final in Java, or use the val keyword in Scala. More important than you not changing your variables is that other programmers can’t change your variables, and you can’t change theirs.

Show me your flowcharts and conceal your tables ...

“Show me your flowcharts (source code), and conceal your tables (domain model), and I shall continue to be mystified; show me your tables (domain model) and I won’t usually need your flowcharts (source code): they’ll be obvious.”

~ Fred Brooks, “The Mythical Man Month