How to manually specify the custom location of a Typesafe Config configuration file

If you need to manually specify the custom location of a Lightbend Config configuration file when running a Scala or Java application, I can confirm that this java command setting works:

java -Dconfig.file=my_app.conf [the rest of your app parameters]
     -------------------------

In my case I read the Lightbend Config file like this in my Scala application:

val config: Config = ConfigFactory.load("my_app.conf")

To demonstrate what I mean, here’s the complete java command I use to run a Scala application I’m working on:

java \
  -Xmx1G \
  -Dconfig.file=kbhr_geo.conf \
  -cp "${CLASSPATH}:./scala-library.jar:./KbhrGeo-assembly-1.0.jar" \
  KbhrGeoApp

In that example, kbhr_geo.conf is the name of my Lightbend configuration file, and it’s located in the current directory where I run that command.

Note: Specifying the filename in the app may not be necessary

As I wrote that text I just realized that it may not be necessary to specify the configuration file filename inside the application; that is, I may just be able to do this inside my application:

val config: Config = ConfigFactory.load()

I just thought about that, and I haven’t tested it yet, but since I specify the configuration file location with the -Dconfig.file parameter, I suspect you might not need to declare the name again inside the application.

ScalikeJdbc configuration file location

As a note to self, this same approach also works when specifying the location of a ScalikeJdbc configuration file, which uses the Lightbend Config library under the covers. In another application I use that same approach to specify the location of the configuration file, and then use this ScalikeJdbc command at the beginning of my application:

DBs.setupAll()

Due to some under-the-covers magic I haven’t read about yet, I can confirm that this approach works with ScalikeJdbc as well.

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