java

Scala code to find (and move or remove) duplicate files

My MacBook recently told me I was running out of disk space. I knew that the way I was backing up my iPhone was resulting in me having multiple copies of photos and videos, so I finally decided to fix that problem by getting rid of all of the duplicate copies of those files.

So I wrote a little Scala program to find all the duplicates and move them to another location, where I could check them before deleting them. The short story is that I started with over 28,000 photos and videos, and the code shown below helped me find nearly 5,000 duplicate photos and videos under my ~/Pictures directory that were taking up over 18GB of storage space. (Put another way, deleting those files saved me 18GB of storage.)

JMH, an SBT plugin for running OpenJDK JMH benchmarks

JMH is an SBT plugin for running OpenJDK JMH benchmarks. Per its docs, “JMH is a Java harness for building, running, and analysing nano/micro/milli/macro benchmarks written in Java and other languages targeting the JVM.”

They also recommend reading an article titled Nanotrusting the Nanotime if you’re interested in writing your own benchmark tests.

Java’s javap command doesn’t show private members (by default)

As I was just reminded, Java’s javap command doesn’t show private members by default. You have to use the -p option of javap to see private members.

I was just reminded of that when using the Scala REPL. Given this Person class with a private constructor field named name:

class Person(private var name: String)

javap without the -p option shows this:

Java example: JMenuBar + KeyStroke + AbstractAction

As a brief note, here’s some source code that I used to create a JMenuBar in a Java application. First, I defined some fields in my main class:

private static final KeyStroke fileOpenKeystroke = KeyStroke.getKeyStroke(KeyEvent.VK_O, Event.META_MASK);
private Action fileOpenAction;
private JMenuBar menuBar;

Later in the same class I defined this method:

A printf format reference page (cheat sheet)

Summary: This page is a printf formatting cheat sheet. I originally created this cheat sheet for my own purposes, and then thought I would share it here.

A cool thing about the printf formatting syntax is that the specifiers you can use are very similar, if not identical, between several different languages, including C, C++, Java, Perl, Ruby, and others, so your knowledge is reusable, which is a good thing.