book

Hello, Scala (free preview) alvin April 9, 2019 - 9:13am

Note: The print version of Hello, Scala on Amazon will be going up to $20 (USD) this Saturday, April 13, 2019. It’s currently just $10, so you know, buy it while it’s on sale and all that. :)

If you like free things, here’s a link to a free preview (PDF) of the new version of my book, “Hello, Scala.” The book is 257 pages long, and the free preview contains the first 120 pages of it, so I hope it’s a significant preview. Hello, Scala is now available for sale, so you can buy the PDF, Kindle ebook, and/or printed book at this link.

Each movement must be an art ~ B.K.S. Iyengar

“Always stretch from the source, the core, the foundation of each asana. Keep your attention internal, not worrying about what others see, but what the Self sees. Each movement must be an art, an art in which the Self is the only spectator.”

B.K.S. Iyengar, Light on Life: The Yoga Journey (with a few minor edits by me)

Functional Programming in Scala for Beginners

I see some crazy/weird critics in the world. I’ll skip the details, but yes, Functional Programming, Simplified is for beginners who are new to functional programming (FP). I wrote it because I thought many other current FP books were too hard to read, and I wasted a lot of my own time with those poorly-written resources. (Frankly, when I see that something is poorly written it makes me think that the author either doesn’t care about his readers, or doesn’t understand the subject well enough to explain it well.)

I guess I could have named my book Functional Programming in Scala for Beginners, but the key thing for me is that if you want more people to learn FP — which should be a positive thing — you need to break it down into smaller components, as I have done. The book isn’t perfect, and I hope the next edition is better, but it seems to be helping a lot of people, so I’m happy about that.

Book/story idea: Life is a game where you have to find your soulmate

New book/story idea: Life is a bit of a game, and as a result you’re put in the vicinity of your soulmate. Not right next door per se, but somewhere within your range of life such that you will encounter this person, such as the friend of a friend, someone you work with, a person you run into at a store, etc. So the game is, out of all the people you meet as your life unfolds, can you identify your soulmate? And maybe as a secondary plot, how do you handle it if you get get close but make a mistake ... say you marry a person which creates circumstances that put you in the vicinity of your soulmate, and you later realize your mistake?

A favorite gift from 2007

A favorite gift from the last twelve years is the purple pencil sharpener shown at the top of this image. It may have only cost a dollar or two, but one of my sisters and her daughters gave it to me when I saw them right before I moved to Alaska, and it’s been with me ever since. I especially like it at times like this, when I’m editing a new book.

The farther you get away from the body, the more you know you alvin January 27, 2019 - 7:40pm

On the recent drive back to Colorado I listened to Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. In the book, The Lady Chablis talked about how much the estrogen shots affected her, mentally and physically — her thoughts, such as who she was attracted to, and her physical attributes.

I’ve often thought about how our thoughts and behavior are affected by our hormones. That’s one reason I like meditation: The farther you get away from the physical body and chemically-influenced brain, the more you can figure out who you are.

Hemingway: Each book should be a new beginning

“For a true writer, each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed.”

~ Ernest Hemingway