programming

Drupal 8: How to write a simple custom “block module” alvin June 21, 2016 - 8:25pm
Table of Contents1 - Goals2 - Backup your database3 - Check my code out of Github, or create a module directory4 - Create a project info YAML file5 - Create the necessary subdirectories6 - Write the code to display your block7 - Clear the caches8 - Enable the module9 - Place the block module10 - See the custom block on your website11 - The biggest problem I encountered12 - The source code13 - Summary

In this tutorial I’ll demonstrate how to write a simple Drupal 8 “block module.” By this I mean that I’ll show you how to write a simple Drupal 8 module that will display output in a block. When you’re done you will have created a new block that you can place in one or more theme regions.

Quotes from Clean Code

Back in 2013 I read the book Clean Code by Robert C. Martin, and in an effort to keep that book alive with me a little while longer, I decided to make my own “Cliffs Notes” version of the book on this page. One of my favorite notes from below is that a language named LOGO used the keyword to in the same way that Scala uses def, so a method named double would be defined as to double... instead of def double..., which seems like it would help developers name methods better.

Software development process standard operating procedures

Some long time ago I was working on a large software development project, and I wasn’t happy with either the quality or the velocity of our programming effort. So one night I sat down and tried to work out an activity diagram to show what our software development process needed to be, to improve both speed and quality. It turns out that a lot of this is just common sense, but for some reason or another team members would try to circumvent the process, which always led to more pain for everyone involved.

Warren Buffett has become a lot better investor since the day I met him

“Warren Buffett has become one hell of a lot better investor since the day I met him, and so have I. If we had been frozen at any given stage with the knowledge we had, the record would have been much worse than it is today. So the game is to keep learning, and I don’t think people are going to keep learning who don’t like the learning process. You need to like the learning process.”

This is another quote by Charlie Munger. It reminds me both of working on good programming teams, but also of learning from people that I haven’t enjoyed working with, but learned things from.

What is the value of learning lambda calculus?

When asked, “What is the value of learning lambda calculus,” Gary Bernhardt replied, “My favorite reason to learn a bit about the lambda calculus: it shows us 1) how simple computation is (at first it seems too simple to compute anything ‘real’); and 2) all of our programming complexity is invented by us (for reasons both good and bad).”

Understanding how the Y-Combinator works

I haven’t watched this video from Ruby Conf 2012 by Jim Weirich yet, but if you’re interested in learning about functional programming only for the sake of learning, here’s the description: “One of the deepest mysteries in the functional programming world is the Y-Combinator. Many have heard of it, but few have mastered its mysteries. Although fairly useless in real world software, understanding how the Y-Combinator works and why it is important gives the student an important insight into the nature of functional programming.”

Making wrong code look wrong (Joel on Software)

A long time ago — 2005, to be exact — I read this article named Making wrong code look wrong, and it was a big influence on me. These days I don’t know how many people use variable naming conventions, but when working on web applications I still like the “us” (unsafe) and “s” (safe) convention for handling user input. As Joel Spolsky discusses in that article, that convention has a good way of making wrong software code look wrong.

“Dark Scrum: The case against the Sprint”

From a Ron Jeffries article, Dark Scrum: The case against the Sprint:

“Let’s consider the Scrum Sprint. What’s the strongest case we can make against it? We’ve already talked about the fact that Sprints are not necessary to teams who are working well: pulling one story, and swarming on it, then another and another, works better, my friends and I believe, than Sprints. (There are good reasons to continue a regular cadence of planning, and certainly of review and retrospection.) But that’s not much of a case. What else ya got?”

The three principles of functional programming

The “three principles of functional programming,” from this tweet:

1. Orthogonal composability
2. Maximum polymorphism
3. Maximum deferment

The “three pillars of functional programming,” from Functional and Reactive Domain Modeling:

1. Referential transparency
2. Substitution model
3. Equational reasoning

When I learned OOP I saw that it was based on several principles that everyone agrees upon. When I started learning FP (and later took two years to write Functional Programming, Simplified) I was surprised there wasn’t a single accepted definition of functional programming. I ran across the principles/pillars in the last two days and was reminded of that again.

How to write Akka Actors: An example video game

Way back in 2013 — before my first fake heart attack followed by learning that I had thyroid cancer — I thought I was about to go “back to work”, and I decided to try to write another visual demo of Akka Actors before I went back to work. I gave myself 10 hours to write something, and at first I decided to just create some bubbles that would move about randomly on screen. But I got that working so fast that I decided to do something else.

Eventually I came up with the idea of a little “kill the bubbles” game, which turned into a “kill the characters” game. This video shows how it works: