quality

Use Case best practice: Test your Use Cases with real data

Quite often when I’m asked to review a UML “Use Case” that someone else has written, I ask “Have you tested your Use Case with real data?” Sadly, the answer is usually “no.”

I don’t know why people don’t do this, but they don’t, and it seems like a very logical thing — essentially a unit test for Use Cases.

Jonathan Ive focused on design, again

As I’ve written about before, I assumed that Apple’s Jonathan Ive had his hands full with the completion of the design of Apple Park, and that was affecting the design and quality of Apple’s recent product offerings. This quote comes from bloomberg.com: “With the completion of Apple Park, Apple’s design leaders and teams are again reporting directly to Jony Ive, who remains focused purely on design,” Amy Bessette, a company spokeswoman, said Friday in a statement.

This is a page from my book, “A Survival Guide for New Consultants”

Be good at what you do

“Chop wood, carry water.”

Zen saying

This point seems obvious, and I hesitate to mention it, but if you want to be an excellent consultant, you should be good at what you do. To be clear, I’m not saying that you have to be great, but you certainly should be good. (Put another way, how can you possibly provide competent advice to others unless you’re good?)

Seven benefits of automated GUI testing

Table of Contents1 - Benefits of automated GUI testing2 - Keys to automated GUI testing and continuous integration3 - Beware automated GUI testing software sales pitches and recorders

Introduction: I first wrote this article about automated GUI testing many years ago, but I find that it still holds today.

I just wrote most of the following note on the Apple Mac Java-dev mailing list, and I'd like to share it here as well, because I think it captures my thoughts on the benefits of automated GUI testing and GUI testing software.

We don’t design for price, we design for experience and quality alvin October 27, 2016 - 4:58pm

“We don’t design for price, we design for the experience and the quality people expect from Mac.”

~ Phil Schiller, Apple

One thing a business analyst should ask about any requirement

As a business analyst (or any person interested in writing software requirements and quality), there is one thing you should always ask yourself whenever you write a business requirement:

Is this software requirement testable?

I’ve seen some business analysts write some crazy things and call them requirements, but IMHO, if you can’t test it, it’s not a requirement.

A few meditation notes (calming, quality)

When I first sit down to meditate, my mind is often too busy to get into it well, so one thing I’ve learned to do is to try to meditate for about eight minutes, then get up, stretch a little bit (a few yoga stretches), then sit back down to meditate normally. My second attempt is usually significantly better than my first attempt. There are other things you can do to calm the mind, but this works well for me.

Another thing I was reminded of again today is that the quality of meditation often changes over time. Today there was something new, and I thought, “Cool ... this is different,” before getting back to the meditation at hand. For me that happens a lot, so I assume it happens for other people as well.

Amazon MP3 quality

A long time ago I wrote about how to improve your iTunes song quality, but that article was about how to make the songs you already have in iTunes sound their best through a couple of tweaks.

This morning I was again listening to a song on YouTube, and then I checked it against the same song I have in iTunes, and the YouTube song quality sounded better than my song, which I purchased through Amazon.com. In short, that led me to find this amazon page where they discuss the (poor) quality of their MP3s, part of which is shown in this image. IMHO, I don’t think people are that concerned about 5 MB file sizes and 56k dialup connections in most places. (They could make this an option.)

Balancing development desire with product goals

This oreilly.com article about balancing quality and product features (from the perspective of a CTO/CIO) is a good read. The editor’s note states, “This is part of a series exploring the trials and tribulations of first-time managers. Camille Fournier, former CTO at Rent the Runway, is often asked for advice on how to make the transition from an individual contributor to a manager.”